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Your Favorite Dharma Gems

For discussion of Buddha Dharma, including teachings common to all Buddhist schools, such as the Four Noble Truths, Dependent Origination, etc., that is not specific to Mahayana or Therevada

Re: Your Favorite Dharma Gems

Postby fukasetsu on Wed Sep 06, 2017 12:45 pm

“[You must] discard all your experiences, your knowledge, and all the things and ideas that you think are the most reliable, most magnificent, and most real, even including your hope [to get free]. It is as if you were entering a sacred building. Before you do so, the guard tells you that you must not carry any weapon, that you must take off all your clothes, and that not only must you be completely naked you also have to leave your body and soul behind. Then you can enter.”

~ Sheng-yen
Everyone for President!
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Re: Your Favorite Dharma Gems

Postby desert_woodworker on Wed Sep 06, 2017 3:07 pm

(fuki; Yes, that sounds about right. --Joe )
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Re: Your Favorite Dharma Gems

Postby Linda Anderson on Thu Sep 07, 2017 6:42 am

If your spiritual practice and the demands of your everyday life are not in harmony, it means there's something wrong with the way you are practicing. Your practice should satisfy your dissatisfied mind while providing solutions to the problems of everyday life. If it doesn't, check carefully to see what you really understand about your religious practice.

Lama Yeshe
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not this morning;
Melon flowers bloomed.
~ Bassho
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Re: Your Favorite Dharma Gems

Postby desert_woodworker on Fri Sep 08, 2017 3:23 pm

.
    "It is good to have a diligent and objective attitude
    towards practice. But to be attached to the idea of
    overcoming your problems will only lead to further
    trouble."

- from Ch'an Master Sheng Yen, Faith In Mind: A Guide to Ch'an Practice (1987);
Dharma Drum Publications; p. 38.
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Re: Your Favorite Dharma Gems

Postby desert_woodworker on Sat Sep 09, 2017 4:36 pm

We know that true Wisdom (prajña) and true Compassion (karuna) arise spontaneously and simultaneously in the awakened person together, in seamless response to conditions just as they present themselves. The Wisdom "informs" the Compassion. Thus, each action is Wise, and Compassionate.

We know, too, from the Thai Forest Tradition Teacher, Achaan Jumnien, that...

"...the Dharma is the truth of the way things are,
while the Dharma as teachings is a reflection in words of this truth."

So, with Dharma being the truth of the way things are, in order to free-up true Wisdom (prajña) and true Compassion (karuna) to arise, it is obvious that the awakened person is (and must be) able to "be in touch with the way things are", that is, can and does intuit and experience this "way", without obstruction, without covering, and without other obfuscation, or motion-of-mind, vexation, or other mechanism of previous ignorance. This is just what is meant by being awake: It is that one is constantly "contemplating" the truth of the way things are, and this constant and steady intuition of truth of the true reality of the way things are, is, -- in other words -- by this description, not "intermittent". And this is so during all the hours of the day and in all the affairs and actions and work of daily-life.

Edward Conze puts this situation as it relates to prajña and karuna succinctly in his Buddhist Thought In India (p.85):

    "Since wisdom is the ability to contemplate dharma, selfless love [true Compassion; karuna] is dependent on wisdom. "
--Joe
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Re: Your Favorite Dharma Gems

Postby Jok_Hae on Wed Sep 13, 2017 12:46 am

desert_woodworker wrote:.
    "It is good to have a diligent and objective attitude
    towards practice. But to be attached to the idea of
    overcoming your problems will only lead to further
    trouble."

- from Ch'an Master Sheng Yen, Faith In Mind: A Guide to Ch'an Practice (1987);
Dharma Drum Publications; p. 38.



This should be tacked on every Zen temple door. :peace:
You make, you get

New Haven Zen Center
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Re: Your Favorite Dharma Gems

Postby desert_woodworker on Wed Sep 13, 2017 2:04 pm

hi, Keith,

Jok_Hae wrote:
desert_woodworker wrote:.
    "It is good to have a diligent and objective attitude
    towards practice. But to be attached to the idea of
    overcoming your problems will only lead to further
    trouble."

- from Ch'an Master Sheng Yen, Faith In Mind: A Guide to Ch'an Practice (1987);
Dharma Drum Publications; p. 38.

This should be tacked on every Zen temple door. :peace:

Thanks! for the idea, Keith, and I'd "second the motion!"

Whereas, what IS tacked-up there in the Old-Country, at least (countries, plural), I note, is equally practical, to wit: At Rinzai places, anyway, what's tacked-up there above the entrance in carved-wood characters are the words of the admonition, "Hold fast to your koan".

:Namaste:,

--Joe
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Re: Your Favorite Dharma Gems

Postby desert_woodworker on Sun Sep 17, 2017 4:35 pm

Someone said in a spoken-word oral-history recording made at Suzuki Roshi's zendo in the 1960s, that,

    "Buddhism is the form of Hinduism that can be exported."
;)

It wasn't entirely in jest that he said this, and I see that there is something to it, although the two are very different in so many, many respects.

But, food for thought!

:heya:

--Joe
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Re: Your Favorite Dharma Gems

Postby desert_woodworker on Sun Sep 17, 2017 4:41 pm

This is not meditation-practice advice, but health and wellness advice from... The American Heart Association:

    "Sit less, move more." ( -Deborah Rohm, American Heart Association)
--Joe
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Re: Your Favorite Dharma Gems

Postby desert_woodworker on Fri Sep 22, 2017 3:56 am

In one of his posts, Guo Gu told us here how, when samadhi had been established in Guo Gu's practice, our teacher Sheng Yen advised him to practice entering and leaving samadhi states.

This reminded me of something said by the Vipassana teacher Leigh Brasington (senior American student of the late Ven. Ayya Khema), when interviewed by Vipassana teacher Richard Shankman. The interchange between these Vipassana teachers appears in Shankman's book, The Experience of Samadhi -- An In-Depth Exploration of Buddhist Meditation (2008), Shambhala, p. 163.

Leigh Brasington is speaking in the quote below:

    "...it is very important, in my opinion, that people learn to intentionally move between the jhanas.
    In fact what I recommend is that people learn to go up through the numbers and back down through
    the numbers, intentionally moving back and forth. This helps you learn how to move into them and
    also gives you two views of the jhana. Its essence is [then] not so much confused with the method of
    entering it, and so you really know what the essence is because you come at the jhana from two
    different directions."
I think that's some really good and very compassionate practical meditation advice.

About half the book is the author Shankman's teaching on samadhi (the jhanas), and the second half is Shankman's dialogs with eight other Vipassana teachers, of whom Brasington, quoted just above, is one.

--Joe
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Re: Your Favorite Dharma Gems

Postby Linda Anderson on Fri Sep 22, 2017 4:28 am

Thanks Joe. I missed that post from Guo Gu.... tho Guo Gu is like that.

Brings back fond memories of my first teacher, a true buddist without the label.... he emphasized the practice of entering and leaving a heightened space... samadhi, if you will, tho he never used such words. In the middle of retreat, he would take us out for a walk in the woods near Sedona... and sometimes to Las Vegas for contrast. :lol2: imagine that! I only had the privilege of a walk in the woods, and once to two diff ancient Hawaiian burial grounds.. one for healing, one where sacrifices took place.... it was quite apparent which was which when you slow down and tune in.

linda
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not this morning;
Melon flowers bloomed.
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Re: Your Favorite Dharma Gems

Postby desert_woodworker on Fri Sep 22, 2017 4:45 am

Linda,

Linda Anderson wrote:Thanks Joe. I missed that post from Guo Gu.... tho Guo Gu is like that.

Guo Gu's relevant post is here, his generously lengthy reply immediately after the post (the OP) where I ask my question:

http://zenforuminternational.org/viewtopic.php?f=32&t=11958

Linda Anderson wrote:Brings back fond memories of my first teacher, a true buddist without the label.... he emphasized the practice of entering and leaving a heightened space... samadhi, if you will, tho he never used such words

Hmm. I think and talk of samadhi as very low-down. One must sink down, I feel to myself about it.

BTW, I too have been to some Hawai'ian sacred places, heiau(s) near the beach, and places up and out in the lava. I saw that lots of small significant gifts are left there by faithful visitors.

--Joe
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Re: Your Favorite Dharma Gems

Postby Linda Anderson on Fri Sep 22, 2017 5:47 am

oh dear heart .... you dismiss so much .... samadhi is neither high nor low
Not last night,
not this morning;
Melon flowers bloomed.
~ Bassho
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Re: Your Favorite Dharma Gems

Postby desert_woodworker on Fri Sep 22, 2017 4:36 pm

Linda,

Linda Anderson wrote:oh dear heart .... you dismiss so much .... samadhi is neither high nor low

"Dismiss"? I don't get that, but maybe no matter.

To me the experienced physical feeling is very low, low down, sinking, stably sunken, not floating, not exhalted.

I'd say, too, that the different samadhis have different feelings within them. You are right that there are some with no bodily feeling at all, quite correct (if that's what you mean; hard to tell because you do not use somatic terms). Commentarial sources also agree with you. In the Zen Buddhist tradition, there's not much talk of them at all, but I think those particular jhanas would be the four formless jhanas, the jhanas numbered "5-8". New to this, I am... .

Shankman's book (2008), The Experience of Samadhi, is the best and most complete introductory or review source I've found on this. His interviews (transcribed-dialogs of conversations) with EIGHT other master Vipassana teachers of varying styles and teaching-emphases give quite a broad look at the spectrum of Vipassana issues, ways, and values. I can recommend Shankman's book without hesitation to anyone interested.

--Joe
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Re: Your Favorite Dharma Gems

Postby bokki on Fri Sep 22, 2017 6:37 pm

oh dear heart .... you dismiss so much .... samadhi is neither high nor low


:hugs:
ty
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10,000 frogs singing in the rain
burst into flames

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Re: Your Favorite Dharma Gems

Postby organizational on Fri Sep 22, 2017 7:12 pm

The most powerful scene
in the hero movie
which i still remember


the master says;
"Please remember
their arrows might destroy our town and topple our Kingdom
but they can never obliterate our culture
Today
you will learn the essence of our culture"


you can watch here;
https://m.youtube.com/#/watch?v=icSwt4hUPTs
hero - Sand Calligraphy
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Re: Your Favorite Dharma Gems

Postby organizational on Fri Sep 22, 2017 7:14 pm

hi bokki, :heya:
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Re: Your Favorite Dharma Gems

Postby bokki on Fri Sep 22, 2017 7:41 pm

oh, thank you very much, Enver, thank u.
b :heya:
very nice 2 c u, very nice.
b
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10,000 frogs singing in the rain
burst into flames

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Re: Your Favorite Dharma Gems

Postby desert_woodworker on Tue Sep 26, 2017 3:59 pm

Here's a piece of a dialog between a monk and Ch'an Master Pai Chang, successor of Ch'an Buddhist Patriarch Ma Tsu:

    "A monk asked Master Pai Chang, 'If the mind is used in the
    transmission of mind, why do you say that there is no mind?'

    Pai Chang replied, 'The non-acquisition of a single thing is called
    the transmission of mind. If you are clear about this mind, there
    is no mind and also no dharma'."
--transl. Charles Luk, in The Transmission of Mind Outside the Teaching (1974)

Regarding "transmission" of mind, Luk writes in a note on another page (p. 43; note 12), that,

    "The transmission of Mind handed down by Bodhidharma after his arrival
    in China is outside the teaching and cannot be explained in words for it
    deals with the immaterial mind which is indescribable and inexpressible.
    To [presume to even attempt to] explain it in words implies a duality of
    subject and object and defeats the very purpose of the Transmission."
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Re: Your Favorite Dharma Gems

Postby desert_woodworker on Sat Oct 07, 2017 2:23 pm

Common-knowledge, but maybe not so common to some, as evidenced occasionally at ZFI over the years. --Joe

    "A prevalent misconception about Zen meditation is that it is a form of not-thinking.
    Dogen clearly rejects this view; that is, zazen is not a conscious effort to blank
    one's mind or turn off all conceptual processes. As Master Uchiyama has observed
    [elsewhere], although one should sit in zazen as unmovably as a rock, one should not
    try to be as unconscious as a rock. To [try to] achieve such a state is not only not
    zazen, it is also impossible. So Dogen maintains that zazen is better characterized
    by without-thinking (hishiryo)."

    -T.P. Kasulis, Zen Action; Zen Person; 1981; University of Hawai'i Press; p. 74.
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