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Introduction to Zen by Roshi Pat Enkyo O'Hara

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Introduction to Zen by Roshi Pat Enkyo O'Hara

Postby Carol on Wed Jul 28, 2010 9:12 am

Here's an excellent article for beginners on meditation, and what zen practice is.

I highly recommend it for all beginners here.

An Introduction to Zen, by Roshi Pat Enkyo O'Hara

Edit: Here's a better link to Enkyo O'hara's article http://www.upaya.org/teachings/what-is-zen.php
Practitioners who cultivate the personal realization of buddha knowledge dwell in the bliss of whatever is present and do not abandon their practice.
~Lankavatara Sutra
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Re: Introduction to Zen by Roshi Pat Enkyo O'Hara

Postby BD1 on Thu Jul 29, 2010 10:14 pm

Thank you Carol,
I appreciate the post, :Namaste:
It can only be what it is...
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Re: Introduction to Zen by Roshi Pat Enkyo O'Hara

Postby Carol on Fri Jul 30, 2010 1:46 am

BD1 wrote:Thank you Carol,
I appreciate the post, :Namaste:


You're welcome.

:Namaste:
Practitioners who cultivate the personal realization of buddha knowledge dwell in the bliss of whatever is present and do not abandon their practice.
~Lankavatara Sutra
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Re: Introduction to Zen by Roshi Pat Enkyo O'Hara

Postby nomouthcrow on Wed Feb 27, 2013 3:20 pm

I can't read it because I'm not subscribed to tricycle, but I found another link!

http://www.upaya.org/teachings/what-is-zen.php
“A shooting star, a clouding of the sight, a lamp, An illusion, a drop of dew, a bubble, A dream, a lightning’s flash, a thunder cloud— This is the way one should see the conditioned.” ~ Vajracchedikā Prajñāpāramitā
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Re: Introduction to Zen by Roshi Pat Enkyo O'Hara

Postby Nonin on Wed Feb 27, 2013 4:27 pm

That's Enkyo O'hara, folks, not "Inkyo."

Hands palm-to-palm,

Nonin
Soto Zen Buddhist Priest. Transmitted Dharma Heir of Dainin Katagiri Roshi.
Abbot and Head Teacher, Nebraska Zen Center / Heartland Temple, Omaha, Nebraska, USA
http://www.prairiewindzen.org
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Re: Introduction to Zen by Roshi Pat Enkyo O'Hara

Postby Carol on Wed Feb 27, 2013 6:53 pm

Nonin wrote:That's Enkyo O'hara, folks, not "Inkyo."

Hands palm-to-palm,

Nonin


Oops! :blush:

I fixed it.
Practitioners who cultivate the personal realization of buddha knowledge dwell in the bliss of whatever is present and do not abandon their practice.
~Lankavatara Sutra
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Re: Introduction to Zen by Roshi Pat Enkyo O'Hara

Postby Nonin on Wed Feb 27, 2013 9:05 pm

Check out the link to Enkyo's article posted by nomouthcrow. It's a solid "how to sit zazen" article.

Hands palm-to-palm,

Nonin
Soto Zen Buddhist Priest. Transmitted Dharma Heir of Dainin Katagiri Roshi.
Abbot and Head Teacher, Nebraska Zen Center / Heartland Temple, Omaha, Nebraska, USA
http://www.prairiewindzen.org
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Re: Introduction to Zen by Roshi Pat Enkyo O'Hara

Postby LearningPatience on Sun Aug 18, 2013 11:24 am

Thank you for posting this.
I have two hart felt questions to ask that addresses this article:

Quote from article:
“The Original Self”
“But something blocks us, and Zen training is one way to see that, all along, we have what we need. This is called the realization of the original self.”

1) Through out many Zen discussions I find the adamant counsel reminding us that we do not have a “self”, let alone a “Self”. But yet it comes up in statements like this as “The Original Self”. Do we or don’t we have an “Original Self”?

2) “But something blocks us…”
What blocks us and why? When we look to the animal kingdom we see creatures behaving naturally, with out “blocks”. They seem to naturally follow their nature. Yet we humans seem to have a heck of a time with this, we have anxiety, despair, fearfulness, we have “hang-ups”, yet we are part of nature and the animal kingdom. We seem to have the capacity to get separated from our nature where as the rest of the animal kingdom stays with their nature. We seem to have the capacity to “loose” ourselves.
If nature naturally “flows” why are we the exception? Does Buddhism address this?

Thanks for any responses.
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Re: Introduction to Zen by Roshi Pat Enkyo O'Hara

Postby another_being on Mon Aug 19, 2013 4:35 pm

^ Learning Patience , :heya:
1. Can 'yes' and 'no' be okay? :) There is the practice of writing 'self' with a lower case and upper case 's' to designate a reflection of the relative and absolute, but these still aren't reality -- just another symbol. The Tao that is called Tao is not the eternal Tao (to paraphrase). To call it Tao or Original Self is not correct, but we have these provisional ways of pointing. But, to what are they pointing?

2. The separating effect of our delusion blocks us. This mental world of labels we've been working on since before birth and take as reality blocks us from the buddha that is life living in this expression of it. The knowledge and assumptions we've accumulated block us. Paraphrasing from the Tao Te Ching again, in the pursuit of knowledge every day something is added and in following the Way, every day something is dropped. Or just drop it all at once. Shed the skin. Drop the weight off your shoulders. Nature naturally flows and we are not the exception. Our labelled world is necessary as well and not separate either. Emptiness and form exactly and precisely the same. This is how it comes out this morning.

:Namaste:
"Some people think they are enlightened, some people think they are not enlightened." -- Denko
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Re: Introduction to Zen by Roshi Pat Enkyo O'Hara

Postby Anders on Mon Aug 19, 2013 5:26 pm

LearningPatience wrote:What blocks us and why? When we look to the animal kingdom we see creatures behaving naturally, with out “blocks”. They seem to naturally follow their nature. Yet we humans seem to have a heck of a time with this, we have anxiety, despair, fearfulness, we have “hang-ups”, yet we are part of nature and the animal kingdom. We seem to have the capacity to get separated from our nature where as the rest of the animal kingdom stays with their nature. We seem to have the capacity to “loose” ourselves.
If nature naturally “flows” why are we the exception? Does Buddhism address this?

Thanks for any responses.


We aren't the exception. If you don't see that animals suffer, have stress, anxiety, ahng-ups etc. I would humbly suggest you aren't looking closely enough.
"Even if my body should be burnt to death in the fires of hell
I would endure it for myriad lifetimes
As your companion in practice"
--- Gandavyuha Sutra
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Re: Introduction to Zen by Roshi Pat Enkyo O'Hara

Postby fukasetsu on Mon Aug 19, 2013 5:56 pm

1) Through out many Zen discussions I find the adamant counsel reminding us that we do not have a “self”, let alone a “Self”. But yet it comes up in statements like this as “The Original Self”. Do we or don’t we have an “Original Self”?

Original Self is just language, and when one asserts reality to concepts we find ourselfs confused by the conceptual mind.
If you replace “Original Self” with “True nature (of mind) / Essence/Absolute/Source/ would that do?
Who reminds you that you don’t have a self is wrong or you misinterpretated it, it cannot be said that we have or do not have a self, rather, those who see a self in the transient are deluded in assuming so, hence the expedient of not-self came into being.
There is just no fixed self to be found in conditioned phenomena/consciousness, that is all.
It does not say “you have a self” or “you do not have a self”.
Do not exchange one idea in for the other, this is just fabricating division in consciousness... a.k.a... duality. Duality alike non-duality also only appears in language.
The inquiry here is: Can you seperate sunlight from the sun? you from the Surpreme?
You (all) are a manifestation of bodhi, yet confused about the manifestation.
Hence deluded about the manifestation, expedients as not-self come into being.
Just don’t be confused.

Looking at it again;
"Any consciousness whatsoever
that is past, future, or present;
internal or external;
blatant or subtle;
common or sublime;
far or near --

every consciousness
is to be seen
as it actually is
with right discernment as:

'This is not mine.
This is not my self.
This is not what I am.'"

~Anatta-lakkhana Sutta

Allright where does it say you have or do not have a self?
Saying “I do not have a self” is the same fabrication as saying “I have a self”
Just understand what you are not, what you really are you can only be, and no word can go there.


2) “But something blocks us…”
What blocks us and why? When we look to the animal kingdom we see creatures behaving naturally, with out “blocks”. They seem to naturally follow their nature. Yet we humans seem to have a heck of a time with this, we have anxiety, despair, fearfulness, we have “hang-ups”, yet we are part of nature and the animal kingdom. We seem to have the capacity to get separated from our nature where as the rest of the animal kingdom stays with their nature. We seem to have the capacity to “loose” ourselves.
If nature naturally “flows” why are we the exception? Does Buddhism address this?

Animals behave “naturally” because they follow a set of habits, karmic dispositions etc
they do not abide in the “natural state” Animal basically live in a state of confusion.
Humans have he capacity to see delusion/illusionary perception for what it is.
The animal state is no fun or natural state, take a close look at your pet for instance without the usual human emotional projections regarding them.
When you see an animal, you're watching name/form/behaviour and mixed with preconceived notions put a label on them, rather you should only see living beings. The consciousness in you,me,an animal, a god is the same. Differences are only in form/behaviour due to karmic dispositions. So when you see that the essence is the same, you would only see living beings, instead of animal/human etc, when you see clearly you will then also see how deluded one being is compared to the other, and this "seeing" is not a conception of intelligence or interpretation.
But there’s no merit in thinking about animals/humans/karma/rebirth etc and come to some conclusion.
better just take care of yourself.
Mijn Oude Vriend uit de woestijn begrijpt geen Nederlands. <3
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Re: Introduction to Zen by Roshi Pat Enkyo O'Hara

Postby LearningPatience on Wed Aug 21, 2013 12:56 pm

Interesting variation of opinions, thanks.
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