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The Bodhisattva Ideal in Zen Buddhism

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Re: The Bodhisattva Ideal in Zen Buddhism

Postby fukasetsu on Sun Jul 09, 2017 4:57 am

desert_woodworker wrote:C., et al.,
Caodemarte wrote:Bipeds! What can you do with them! :hugs:

We can put them on ALL-FOURS. Prostrations are a great centering and strengthening practice.

More to say, but let's go with that.

:rbow:

--Joe


The constant desire of wanting to experience something, drugs, love, vacation, spirituality, it's a side show :PP:

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Re: The Bodhisattva Ideal in Zen Buddhism

Postby Caodemarte on Sun Aug 13, 2017 4:48 pm

Please note that the after life posts have been moved to "Re: Afterlife"(viewtopic.php?f=129&t=11924) thread that was split off from this one.
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Re: The Bodhisattva Ideal in Zen Buddhism

Postby fukasetsu on Sun Aug 13, 2017 4:58 pm

Caodemarte wrote:Please note that the after life posts have been moved to "Re: Afterlife"(viewtopic.php?f=129&t=11924) thread that was split off from this one.


Another admin, yes nice job. :daisy:
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Re: The Bodhisattva Ideal in Zen Buddhism

Postby Linda Anderson on Sun Aug 13, 2017 5:21 pm

ha! The Buddha was orthodox? like a rock? ... 10,000 things and many more expressions looking like ppl.... How can a river be seen as orthodox? Buddha nature pervades the entire universe... right here, right now. then, take away the right here, right now, the words of it, not the awareness ...
Not last night,
not this morning;
Melon flowers bloomed.
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Re: The Bodhisattva Ideal in Zen Buddhism

Postby desert_woodworker on Sun Aug 13, 2017 5:29 pm

The Buddha was true to Buddha Nature. That's the only orthodoxy.

:lol2: ;) :heya: :Namaste: :)X :tongueincheek:

g'day!,

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Re: The Bodhisattva Ideal in Zen Buddhism

Postby Boatman Bodhisattva on Mon Aug 14, 2017 7:53 pm

The main idea behind the Bodhisattva ideal is that a main reason for being a Buddhist is to learn how to be more compassionate, something which can only be practiced in one's daily life.

It's best not to dwell so much on whether or not one will be reborn for a certain amount of lifetimes as part of the Bodhisattva career. What matters is whether, here and now, we are practicing the Six Paramitas, which are the basic practices of a Bodhisattva:

The six paramitas or 'transcendent perfections' (Skt. ṣaṭpāramitā; Tib. ཕ་རོལ་ཏུ་ཕྱིན་པ་དྲུག་, parol tu chinpa druk; Wyl. pha rol tu phyin pa drug) comprise the training of a bodhisattva, which is bodhichitta in action.

Generosity (Skt. dāna; Tib. སྦྱིན་པ་, jinpa): to cultivate the attitude of generosity.
Discipline (Skt. śīla; Tib. ཚུལ་ཁྲིམས་, tsultrim): refraining from harm.
Patience (Skt. kṣānti; Tib. བཟོད་པ་, zöpa): the ability not to be perturbed by anything.
Diligence (Skt. vīrya; Tib. བརྩོན་འགྲུས་, tsöndrü): to find joy in what is virtuous, positive or wholesome.
Meditative concentration (Skt. dhyāna; Tib. བསམ་གཏན་, samten): not to be distracted.
Wisdom (Skt. prajñā; Tib. ཤེས་རབ་, sherab): the perfect discrimination of phenomena, all knowable things.
http://www.rigpawiki.org/index.php?title=Six_paramitas


If you practice the Six Paramitas, you are bound to find more joy and inner peace in the present life, regardless of whether the Bodhisattva ideal is literally true.
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Re: The Bodhisattva Ideal in Zen Buddhism

Postby desert_woodworker on Tue Aug 15, 2017 9:46 pm

BB, et al.,

Boatman Bodhisattva wrote:If you practice the Six Paramitas, you are bound to find more joy and inner peace in the present life, regardless of whether the Bodhisattva ideal is literally true.

Instead, let your Teacher inform you about what's in store to undertake, practice-wise, for a Bodhisattva-want-to-be ("wannabe"). There's not just a couple or six things. Don't guess! And guidance and blood-letting by an expert is needed pretty regularly until you find that your eyes are horizontal, and your nose is vertical. And even after that, if you're honest. ;) Blessings. Many.

:Namaste:

--Joe
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Re: The Bodhisattva Ideal in Zen Buddhism

Postby fukasetsu on Tue Aug 15, 2017 9:55 pm

ps for anyone interested with the "practise of non-dwelling"

Hui Hai wrote:Q: Where can one enter the doorway to this understanding?
A: Through the perfection of charity (dana-paramita).

Q: Buddha has said that the six paramitas are the action of the Bodhisattva path, so how can we enter the doorway to this understanding by practicing, as you have said, only the dana-paramita?
A: People who are confused or deluded do not understand that the other five paramitas all evolve from the dana-paramita. Therefore, in practicing the dana-paramita, one also fulfills the practice of the other five paramitas.

Q: For what reason is it called the dana-paramita?
A: "Dana" means the perfection of charity.

Q: What things can be given up in the name of charity?
A: Clinging to thoughts of duality can be given up.

Q: Just what does this mean?
A: It means to give up clinging, in the name of charity, to thoughts of good and evil, existence and non-existence, love and hate, emptiness and fullness, concentration and non-concentration, pure and impure, etc. In the name of charity, give up all of them. Then, and only then, can you attain the stage of the voidness of duality, while, at the same time, letting neither a thought about the voidness of opposites nor about charity arise. This is the genuine practice of the dana-paramita, which is also known as absolute detachment from all phenomena. This is only the voidness of all dharma-nature, which means that always and everywhere is just no-mind. If one can attain the stage of no-mind everywhere, no form will be perceived, because our self-nature is void, containing no form. This, then, is true Reality, which is also called the wonderful form or body of the Tathagata. The Diamond Sutra says: "Those who have abandoned all forms are called Buddhas."

Q: But the Buddha spoke about six paramitas, so how can you reasonably say that one paramita (the dana-paramita) can include the other five?
A: The Sutra of the Benefits of Thinking says: "The Jalavidyadeva spoke to Brahmadeva as follows: 'Bodhisattvas who abandon all defilements are said to have completed the dana-paramita. This is the perfection of charity. If there is the non-arising of a single thought, they are said to have completed the sila-paramita. This the perfection of discipline. If there is no injury to or harm by any dharma, they are said to have completed the ksanti-paramita. This is the perfection of patience. If there is non-attachment to all dharmas, they are said to have completed the virya-paramita. This is the perfection of zeal. If there is non-dwelling on any dharma whatsoever, they are said to have completed the dhyana-paramita. This is the perfection of serenity. If there is no use of sophistry in speaking of any dharma, they are said to have completed the prajna-paramita. This is the perfection of wisdom. These are also known as the six Dharmas without any difference. The first one involves giving; the second one, non-arising of sensation; the third one, the non-arising of thought; the fourth one, being detached from form; the fifth one, non-dwelling in any dharma; and the sixth one, speaking without sophistry. These six paramitas are given different names expediently to meet different needs, but the wonderful principle underlying them all is not different. Thus, if one thing is abandoned, then everything is abandoned; and if one thing does not arise, then nothing whatsoever arises. Deluded people cannot understand this, and even insist that these six paramitas, or methods, are different. Thus, these foolish people, clinging to the variety of methods, revolve endlessly on the Wheel-of-Life-and-Death. Therefore, I urge all you students just to practice the one method of the dana-paramita, which, since it includes completely all dharmas, must, logically, include the other five paramitas.


http://www.ymba.org/books/entering-tao- ... ightenment
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