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Zen Liturgical Book for Daily Practice

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Re: Zen Liturgical Book for Daily Practice

Postby jundo on Thu Jun 29, 2017 2:36 pm

Sadaparibhuta wrote:I am looking for a liturgical book for home practice of Zen ritual. Do you have any suggestions? I appreciate your help. :Namaste:

This is what I've found so far:

https://www.amazon.com/Chanting-Breath- ... +by+Breath

https://www.amazon.com/dp/0938077910/re ... g=UTF8&me=

https://www.amazon.com/Bringing-Sacred- ... 1590305337

https://www.amazon.com/Zen-Chants-Thirt ... zen+ritual

http://www.shambhala.com/zenchants


Hi,

The TNH books are lovely, in the flavor of Plum Village. The Daido Loori is my top recommendation, however, for the explanation of various rituals that can be undertaken by someone at home. The Tanahashi book is a little tangled, and has more to do with the history of some of the chants linguistically than their actual recitation. I also recommend Living By Vow by Okumura Roshi, a wonderful Soto Zen teacher ...

http://www.wisdompubs.org/book/living-vow

You may also come across some books by the late Jiyu Kennett Roshi who was someone prone to mystical visions, and who worked very hard to "Christianize" (in style, not in wording or content) her liturgy at Shasta Abbey/OBC (for example, their Heart Sutra sounds rather like a Gregorian Chant). It resonates with some, but is not for everyone.

Gassho, Jundo

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Re: Zen Liturgical Book for Daily Practice

Postby Spike on Thu Jun 29, 2017 5:58 pm

jundo wrote:You may also come across some books by the late Jiyu Kennett Roshi who was someone prone to mystical visions, and who worked very hard to "Christianize" (in style, not in wording or content) her liturgy at Shasta Abbey/OBC (for example, their Heart Sutra sounds rather like a Gregorian Chant). It resonates with some, but is not for everyone.


Yes, in fact, we did chant in Gregorian mode at Shasta (in 1971, the year I visited). Very surprising and beautiful.

As a guest student at RZC, also 1971, I learned their beautifully translated (Kapleau?) English version of the Heart Sutra. Here it is:

Heart of Perfect Wisdom
(Prajña Paramita Hridaya)
The Bodhisattva of Compassion
from the depths of prajña wisdom
saw the emptiness of all five skandhas
and sundered the bonds that cause all suffering.
Know then :
Form here is only emptiness ;
emptiness only form.
Form is no other than emptiness ;
emptiness no other than form.
Feeling, thought, and choice—
consciousness itself—
are the same as this.
Dharmas here are empty ;
all are the primal void.
None are born or die,
nor are they stained or pure,
nor do they wax or wane.
So in emptiness no form,
no feeling, thought, or choice,
nor is there consciousness.
No eye, ear, nose, tongue, body, mind,
no color, sound, smell, taste, touch,
or what the mind takes hold of,
nor even act of sensing.
No ignorance or end of it,
nor all that comes of ignorance :
No withering, no death, no end of them.
Nor is there pain, or cause of pain,
or cease in pain,
or noble path to lead from pain ;
not even wisdom to attain :
Attainment too is emptiness.
So know that the Bodhisattva,
holding to nothing whatever,
but dwelling in prajña wisdom,
is freed of delusive hindrance,
rid of the fear bred by it,
and reaches clearest nirvana.
All buddhas of past and present,
buddhas of future time,
through faith in prajña wisdom,
come to full enlightenment.
Know then the great dharani,
the radiant, peerless mantra,
the supreme, unfailing mantra,
the Prajña Paramita,
whose words allay all pain.
This is highest wisdom,
true beyond all doubt ;
know and proclaim its truth :
Gate, gate
paragate
parasamgate
bodhi, svaha!

the "sva" is drawn out and strengthens, then the "ha!" is like qwatz!

I still do this. Their chant book is free at https://www.rzc.org/publications/zen-center-chants/

Also available for free online are the san francisco zc's chants at http://www.sfzc.org/teachings/services- ... exts-songs

Having studied at sfzc, green gulch and tassajara in the Baker days, I have gone back many times, and enjoyed their chants (and everything else).

Finally, many centers also have the Japanese translation of chants. They are worth it from a breath standpoint. Usually these are identical from center to center.
Ripple in still water
When there is no pebble tossed
Nor wind to blow. --R.H.
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Re: Zen Liturgical Book for Daily Practice

Postby Meido on Thu Jun 29, 2017 6:44 pm

To add to the suggestions already posted...if you are looking for a short kuyo for daily use, here is a nice one that we use. Our chant book has the translations, but all are easily found online as well:

OKYO FOR DAILY LAY PRACTICE

(If you maintain an altar [butsudan], light candles and offer incense)

JYU BUTSU MYO
(gassho)

Shin-jin-pa-shin-bi-ru-sha-no-fu.
En-mon-ho-shin-ru-sha-no-fu.
Sen-pai-kya-shin-shi-kya-mu-ni-fu.
To-rai-a-san-mi-ru-son-bu.
Ji-ho-san-shi-i-shi-shi-fu.
Dai-shin-bun-ji-su-ri-bu-sa.
Dai-an-fu-gen-bu-sa.
Dai-hi-kan-shi-in-bu-sa.
Shi-son-bu-sa-mo-ko-sa.
Mo-ko-ho-jya-ho-ro-mi.


SANGEMON
(gassho, repeat three times)

Ga shaku sho zo shoakugo kaiyu mushi
tonjinchi jushin gui shi shosho issai gakon kai
sange.


SANKI KAI
(gassho, repeat three times)

Namu-kie-butsu,
namu-kie-ho,
namu-kie-so.
Kie-butsu-mujo-son,
kie-ho-riyoku-son,
kie-so-wago-son.
Kie-butsu-kyo,
kie-ho-kyo,
kie-so-kyo.


MAKAHANNYA HARAMITA SHINGYO

Kan-ji-zai-bo-satsu, gyo-jin-han-nya ha-ra-mitta-ji,
sho-ken-go-on-kai-ku, do issai ku-yaku.
Sha-ri-shi, shiki-fu-i-ku, ku-fu-i-shiki, shikisoku-ze-ku,
ku-soku-ze-shiki, ju-so-gyo-shiki,
yaku-bu-nyo-ze. Sha-ri-shi, ze-sho-ho-ku-so,
fu-sho fu-metsu, fu-ku fu-jo, fu-zo fu-gen.
Ze-ko ku-chu, mu-shiki mu-ju-so-gyo-shiki,
mu-gen-ni-bi-zesshin-i, mu-shiki-sho-ko-mi-
soku-ho, mu-gen-kai-nai-shi-mu-i shiki-kai-mumu-myo-yaku
mu-mu-myo-jin, nai-shi-mu-roshi,
yaku-mu ro-shi-jin, mu-ku shu-metsu-do,
mu-chi-yaku mu-toku. I-mu-sho-tok-ko, Bodai-sat-ta,
e-han-nya ha-ra-mi-ta-ko, shin-mukei-ge,
mu-kei-ge-ko, mu-u-ku-fu, on-ri issai
ten-do-mu-so, ku-gyo, ne-han. San-ze-shobutsu,
e-han-nya-ha-ra-mi-ta-ko, toku-a-noku
ta-ra-san myaku-san-bo-dai, ko-chi-han-nya-hara-mit-ta,
ze-dai-jin-shu, ze-dai-myo-shu, zemu-jo-shu,
ze-mu-to-do-shu, no-jo-issai-ku,
shin-jitsu-fu-ko, ko-setsu-han-nya-ha-ra-mit-tashu,
soku-setsu-shu-watsu, “Gya-tei gya-tei, hara-gya-tei,
haraso-gya-tei, bo-ji sowaka.”
Hannya-shingyo.


SHOSAISHU
(repeat three times)

Na-mu-sa-man-da, mo-to-nan, o-ha-ra-chi, koto-sha,
so-no-nan, to-ji-to, en, gya-gya, gya-ki,
gya-ki, unnun, shi-fu-ra-shi-fu-ra, ha-ra-shi-fura-ha-ra-shi-fu-ra,
chi-shu-sa-chi-shu-sa, shushi-ri-shu-shi-ri,
so-ha-ja-so-ha-ja se-chi-gya,
shi-ri-ei, so-mo-ko.


HONZON EKO
(gassho)

NYAN-NI SAMPO ANSU SHINSHI.
JO-RAI FUN-ZU “HO-JYA SHIN-KIN”
“SHO-SAI-MYO KI-JYO JIN-SHU”
SUSHI-KUNTEI UI-KYO
“HON-SU SHI-KYA JI-RAI”.*
SHIN-JI JI-SHI SO-NEN BU-JYO BUKO
BU-JI JYO HOSU-IN ASU SAN NYU
HAKAI GIN SAN ZUN-NEN SHU-SHI.
JI-HO SAN-SHI I-SHI-SHIBU-SHI-SON
BUSA MOKO-SA MOKO HO-JYA
HORO-MI.

*If the honzon (the main statue on the butsudan) is Sakyamuni. If not, this may be changed
e.g. “Daishin Bunji Suri Busa” if the honzon is Monju.



SHIKU SEIGAN MON
(gassho, repeat three times)

Shu-jo mu-hen sei-gan-do;
Bon-no mu-jin sei-gan-dan;
Ho-mon mu-ryo sei-gan-gaku;
Butsu-do mu-jo sei-gan-jo.


ENMEI JUKKU KANNON GYO
(gassho, repeat three times)

Kan-ze-on, na-mu-butsu, yo-butsu-u-in, yo-butsu-u-en,
bup-po-so-en, jo-raku-ga-jo, chonen-kan-ze-on,
bo-nen-kan-ze-on, nen-nen-jushin-ki,
nen-nen-fu-ri-shin.

(Perform three bows [sanpai] at the completion of chanting)
The Rinzai Zen Way: A Guide to Practice
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Madison Rinzai Zen Community/Ryugen-ji [機山龍源寺]: http://www.madisonrinzaizen.org
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Re: Zen Liturgical Book for Daily Practice

Postby Sadaparibhuta on Thu Jun 29, 2017 8:00 pm

Thank you for the recommendations. I bought this one last night with store credit I had on Amazon:
https://www.amazon.com/Zen-Chants-Thirt ... zen+ritual

John Daido Loori's book didn't seem to have as many chants in it, though I could be mistaken.
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Re: Zen Liturgical Book for Daily Practice

Postby Guo Gu on Thu Jun 29, 2017 8:27 pm

hello Sadaparibhuta,
i'm a little late in the conversation, sorry.
here's the abbreviated liturgy at our chan center suitable for retreats and daily use: http://www.tallahasseechan.com/pdfs/Liturgy_for_TCG.pdf
i've given two classes son how to chant, the mp3 files of which can be found here, scroll down to the end of the page: http://www.tallahasseechan.com/talks.html
the melodies you hear in the audio files are of the chinese chan tradition.
be well,
guo gu
Founder and teacher of Tallahassee Chan Center of the Dharma Drum Lineage of Chan Buddhism
http://www.tallahasseechan.org/
Received inka from Master Sheng Yen (1930-2009) in 1995
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Re: Zen Liturgical Book for Daily Practice

Postby Sadaparibhuta on Thu Jun 29, 2017 8:38 pm

Guo Gu wrote:hello Sadaparibhuta,
i'm a little late in the conversation, sorry.
here's the abbreviated liturgy at our chan center suitable for retreats and daily use: http://www.tallahasseechan.com/pdfs/Liturgy_for_TCG.pdf
i've given two classes son how to chant, the mp3 files of which can be found here, scroll down to the end of the page: http://www.tallahasseechan.com/talks.html
the melodies you hear in the audio files are of the chinese chan tradition.
be well,
guo gu


Thank you for the recommendation. It looks like that Chinese Chan liturgy has the same chants that are included in the Japanese Zen liturgy. Is that generally the case?
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Re: Zen Liturgical Book for Daily Practice

Postby Caodemarte on Thu Jun 29, 2017 11:38 pm

While the content is often the same Chinese characters, my understanding (based on hearing them) is that Chinese and Korean (and I believe Vietnamese) Zen chants are usually "sung" with a rhythm while Japanese Zen chants are quite distinctive, forceful, explosive, with almost a monotone. I don't know if this is based solely on the sound values of Japanese readings of Chinese characters or what the history here is. Does anyone know?
Last edited by Caodemarte on Fri Jun 30, 2017 12:37 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Zen Liturgical Book for Daily Practice

Postby Meido on Fri Jun 30, 2017 12:31 am

Caodemarte wrote:...Japanese Zen chants are quite distinctive, forceful, explosive, with almost a monotone. I don't know if this is based solely on the sound values of Japanese readings of Chinese characters or what the history here is. Does anyone know.


It's a good question. AFAIK the Zen style of chanting simply preserves the style of liturgy that was transmitted from late Song China in those lineages. An exception could be Obaku-shu, which as a later Ming transmission still preserves a different flavor in some ways. I'm not familiar with Obaku ceremony, but this video contains a melodic style and other elements quite different from other Zen kuyo: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=urHPtXZ9iKE

Perhaps Jundo knows and could say more.

Shingon and Tendai shomyo, which I expect pre-dates all of this, is of course melodic. Quite wonderful, e.g. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4J-vi0lCiew

And though not formal liturgy, there is goeika in Zen e.g. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-uqSCUE1750

~ Meido
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Korinji monastery [臨済宗 • 祖的山光林禅寺]: http://www.korinji.org
Madison Rinzai Zen Community/Ryugen-ji [機山龍源寺]: http://www.madisonrinzaizen.org
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Re: Zen Liturgical Book for Daily Practice

Postby Sadaparibhuta on Fri Jun 30, 2017 2:17 am

Is the 10 Verse Kannon Sutra only part of Japanese Buddhism? Is it part of Chinese Buddhism as well?
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Re: Zen Liturgical Book for Daily Practice

Postby Guo Gu on Fri Jun 30, 2017 4:10 am

Sadaparibhuta wrote:
Guo Gu wrote:hello Sadaparibhuta,
i'm a little late in the conversation, sorry.
here's the abbreviated liturgy at our chan center suitable for retreats and daily use: http://www.tallahasseechan.com/pdfs/Liturgy_for_TCG.pdf
i've given two classes son how to chant, the mp3 files of which can be found here, scroll down to the end of the page: http://www.tallahasseechan.com/talks.html
the melodies you hear in the audio files are of the chinese chan tradition.
be well,
guo gu


Thank you for the recommendation. It looks like that Chinese Chan liturgy has the same chants that are included in the Japanese Zen liturgy. Is that generally the case?


the chinese chants transmitted to japan at different periods. in japan, the chants then undergone modifications. it's not as simple as a pure preservation of song chan liturgy. i guess what i'm saying is things are always more complicated than what they seem...
over the centuries the japanese liturgical versions have gone through different accretions. for example, the ten verse kannon sutra originates during the ming period, but has made in into rinzai (non-obaku) sects' liturgy seamlessly in the 18th century. that "sutra" actually stem from popular (or folkoric) form of buddhism in china. it would be considered non-canonical, apocrypha.
also, it's not that the chinese liturgies have remained stable... far from it. over the centuries, so many accretions have changed the form of the liturgies. i would say much of the general services we see today comes from the ming period actually. the specialized ones (*some* version of the water and land rites, the multiple lotus repentance rites, etc) dates back much earlier.
in sum, what i'm saying is: the chants are impermanence and empty :)
be well,
guo gu
Founder and teacher of Tallahassee Chan Center of the Dharma Drum Lineage of Chan Buddhism
http://www.tallahasseechan.org/
Received inka from Master Sheng Yen (1930-2009) in 1995
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Re: Zen Liturgical Book for Daily Practice

Postby Meido on Fri Jun 30, 2017 4:45 am

Good info, thanks Guo Gu. And point well taken RE things not being always so simple.

About the 10-verse Kannon sutra, I realize I have no clue as to when it actually entered into common use in Rinzai monasteries. Since Hakuin chose to popularize it as an everyday practice for common folks, I'm wondering now if his doing so is what led it to become a part of formal Rinzai liturgy, or if that had already been the case by the time he picked up on it. In any case, his use of it in this way seems in line with its origins.

RE origins of melodic vs non-melodic chanting style, any thoughts?

~ Meido
The Rinzai Zen Way: A Guide to Practice
Korinji monastery [臨済宗 • 祖的山光林禅寺]: http://www.korinji.org
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Re: Zen Liturgical Book for Daily Practice

Postby jundo on Fri Jun 30, 2017 12:28 pm

I do have a question for both Guo Gu and Meido on the 10-verse Kannon sutra/Enmei Jukku Kannon Gyo. When I was under the tutelage of an American White Plum priest for a few years, he practiced a version (which I have since adopted, as it gets the heart beating in the morning) in which the Chant starts at a slow beat, then builds and builds until the last verse is almost screamed and blows the roof off the place. The word "Kazeon" especially is hit almost explosively.

Is this a White Plum thing, or something found in any way in your Traditions?

Here is a video of someone unknown who seems to be doing so (see about 3:30 mark), but not with half the energy of my mentor ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8EIinCzAVIA

Gassho, Jundo
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Re: Zen Liturgical Book for Daily Practice

Postby Meido on Fri Jun 30, 2017 3:13 pm

Jundo, I've seen that as well. In Rinzai choka this chant is usually last, and in our place we've always just repeated it 3 times. But greater number of repetitions (I think it was 15) with increasing speed/energy as you describe was the custom at sesshin I attended with a teacher in Eido Roshi's line. At the time it surprised me....something new.

~ Meido
The Rinzai Zen Way: A Guide to Practice
Korinji monastery [臨済宗 • 祖的山光林禅寺]: http://www.korinji.org
Madison Rinzai Zen Community/Ryugen-ji [機山龍源寺]: http://www.madisonrinzaizen.org
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Re: Zen Liturgical Book for Daily Practice

Postby Guo Gu on Fri Jun 30, 2017 9:30 pm

this is turning into a three way conversation.... we should get together one of these days to exchange and share what we know for three days (or sit in silence). meido i haven't seen you in over 20 yrs; jundo, we haven't met in person.

anyway, the melodic chanting as far as i know is a medieval chinese thing that continued (with varying accretions and changes) to the modern period. yinyuan introduced it to japan in the late ming as part of the obaku tradition. whatever dogen eisai learned in china should have included the melodic chant. no one has done research into kamakura japan chanting style, so i don't know how long the current monotone style dates back to.

jundo, the starting slow and speeding up of the chanting practice is part of the chinese tradition in general that is mostly found in the liturgical tradition. there is no clear indication how far this dates back in historical sources. so the practice is not limited to only the 10 verse kannon sutra. i will say that when we (in taiwan mostly) lead a recitation chan retreat (using the buddha's name as a method) we do this. once the chanting is sped up, we stay at a pretty fast tempo, then suddenly the instruments and leader stops and everyone stops--that suddenness and shock leaves the retreatants in a very clear state of mind--then this is followed by silent meditation. the power and presence of over 100 retreatants chanting like this in unison creates an incredible amount of concentration in the hall. the concentration reached in this practice is pretty intense. there's no room for wandering thoughts. some ppl enter into deep concentration (for a few hours) as a result--not that this is ideal or anything. i'm just reporting as an example of the intensity of a "tight" method of practice.

I will also say that one's not supposed to chant with one's throat (the guy in the video is using his throat to chant, so he will not be able to sustain it).... otherwise by the end of the 7-day retreat one's voice will be gone for sure! one is supposed to relax the whole body and throat, allowing the energy to well up from one's abdomen and out through one's vocal cords. the method is to chant relaxingly with one's body, listen to everyone else' voice (can't listen to one's own voice), and mentally focus on the sound. so body, speech, and mind are unified.

one note, back to historical precedents, i have found in huaigan's 懷感 (601-694?) jingtu qunyi lun 淨土群疑論 (treatise on doubts pertaining to the pure land) that on his retreats young boys used to enter into samadhi as a result of chanting possibly like this. i say possible because the referent is only suggestive. he was credited as the innovator of the five melodic chanting style. in case you don't know of him, he was the disciple of shandao 善導, where all the so-called "pure land schools" trace back to.

hope this helps.
be well,
guo gu
Founder and teacher of Tallahassee Chan Center of the Dharma Drum Lineage of Chan Buddhism
http://www.tallahasseechan.org/
Received inka from Master Sheng Yen (1930-2009) in 1995
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Re: Zen Liturgical Book for Daily Practice

Postby Michaeljc on Sat Jul 01, 2017 2:02 am

I am particularly interested in the pitch in which the chant operates. I did a couple of sesshin with John Daido Loori many years ago I particularly enjoyed the chanting. The pitch was set such that men with baritone or base voices could chant at a very low pitch

Because of this pitch male tenors can chant one octave higher. This pitch falls within a very easy range for the female voice. It all added up to a lovely resonance

I have never struck this being adopted since. Even Loori’s Mountains and Rivers order have changed since his death
It is very important that the chant leader has a degree of what is called ‘perfect pitch’ i.e. the ability to start the chant at the approximate pitch/note. A male baritone starting in the low end of his range will do it. Another approach would be to find a bell that is of the correct pitch to start the chant

It is worth experimenting with as IMO it adds a further dimension – that Tibetan sound starts to come, through which can be
rather beautiful.

Try it :)

Regards

M
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Re: Zen Liturgical Book for Daily Practice

Postby Meido on Sat Jul 01, 2017 2:20 am

GG, thanks again.

Guo Gu wrote:we should get together one of these days to exchange and share what we know for three days (or sit in silence). meido i haven't seen you in over 20 yrs; jundo, we haven't met in person.


Good idea that, and hopefully both exchange and silence. 27 years, I think.

Michael, you might be interested in an article one of the teachers in our line wrote. He was a music guy, and discusses chanting from the standpoint of kozen no ki (universal energy), vibration and resonance, the manner in which the practice vibrates the body cavities, the use of chanting to enter samadhi, etc. Guo Gu's point about not chanting from the throat is an important one, also made there. If you or anyone else would like to read this, PM me with your email address and I can send it.

~ Meido
The Rinzai Zen Way: A Guide to Practice
Korinji monastery [臨済宗 • 祖的山光林禅寺]: http://www.korinji.org
Madison Rinzai Zen Community/Ryugen-ji [機山龍源寺]: http://www.madisonrinzaizen.org
The Rinzai Zen Community: http://www.rinzaizen.org
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