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Re: Favorite Sayings from other traditions

PostPosted: Sat Sep 02, 2017 3:50 am
by fukasetsu
“My teacher called this world ‘the great heartbreak.’ When we really begin to wake up to our true nature, we become more conscious of the suffering around us. We feel the people and the events of our lives more profoundly, not less profoundly. We become more present here and now. What we see is that, even though our vision may have expanded, even though we may have woken up not just to reality, but as reality, still we can’t control anyone. Everything and everyone has their own life to live, and we can’t just wipe away their suffering because our hearts are open. Although we would love to have everyone wake up and be happy, part of the heartbreak is accepting this moment, this world, just as it is.”

~ Adyashanti

Re: Favorite Sayings from other traditions

PostPosted: Sat Sep 02, 2017 4:18 am
by Linda Anderson
fukasetsu wrote:“My teacher called this world ‘the great heartbreak.’ When we really begin to wake up to our true nature, we become more conscious of the suffering around us. We feel the people and the events of our lives more profoundly, not less profoundly. We become more present here and now. What we see is that, even though our vision may have expanded, even though we may have woken up not just to reality, but as reality, still we can’t control anyone. Everything and everyone has their own life to live, and we can’t just wipe away their suffering because our hearts are open. Although we would love to have everyone wake up and be happy, part of the heartbreak is accepting this moment, this world, just as it is.”

~ Adyashanti


nice Marcel.... I sat with Adya before he got big... twice a month I drove down to Berkeley back in the early 2000's. I believe his teacher was named Avis, a simple woman and zen teacher who did not hold retreats/sesshin she was too small ... he did that in other locations. My first and only retreat with him was on his 40th birthday in 2002.... I blew my credit card to get there. no regrets :) Back then, he had so many funny stories about his pursuit of zen tho he never presented himself as a zen teacher.... funny how we make more of it then it really is. My first teacher who was not Buddhist in training also had a wise awakened woman as his teacher... these are rare souls who don't carry the banner. Adya has had to transition over the years to a message that can be heard by all. Back in the day, he would stop talking and there was just radiance. Few times I've seen him in recent years, there still is.

Re: Favorite Sayings from other traditions

PostPosted: Sat Sep 02, 2017 4:30 am
by fukasetsu
Wonderful thanks for sharing, you've been graced to meet beings like that. I met a few rare beings too, though never in a robe or quoting scripture. They all appeared just at the right time according to my needs, its like magic ;)

Re: Favorite Sayings from other traditions

PostPosted: Sat Sep 02, 2017 4:33 am
by Linda Anderson
fukasetsu wrote:Wonderful thanks for sharing, you've been graced to meet beings like that. I met a few rare beings too, though never in a robe or quoting scripture. They all appeared just at the right time according to my needs, its like magic ;)


Sweetheart, the magic in you had something to do with that..... you could say karma, or whatever. And, don't overlook the glance at the grocery store when the arrow finds it's mark. no words.

Re: Favorite Sayings from other traditions

PostPosted: Sat Sep 02, 2017 4:45 am
by fukasetsu
Linda wrote:
Sweetheart, the magic in you had something to do with that..... you could say karma, or whatever. And, don't overlook the glance at the grocery store when the arrow finds it's mark. no words.


:ghug:

Re: Favorite Sayings from other traditions

PostPosted: Sat Sep 02, 2017 6:07 am
by desert_woodworker
"What goes around, comes around." - Anonymous (and "tradition" unknown)

Re: Favorite Sayings from other traditions

PostPosted: Sat Sep 02, 2017 4:43 pm
by fukasetsu
desert_woodworker wrote:"What goes around, comes around." - Anonymous (and "tradition" unknown)


Not allowing alcohol into the house made that clear again, it starts with a single beer
and a year later half the neighbourhood wants to drink along. :lol2:

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You can find what you have lost, but you cannot find what you have not lost.
Only when you realise the true peace, the peace you have never lost, that peace will remain with you, for it never was away.
Instead of searching for what you do not have, find out what is it that you never lost.
That which is there before the beginning and after the ending of everything:
that to which there is no birth, nor death.

~Sri Niz.

Re: Favorite Sayings from other traditions

PostPosted: Sat Sep 02, 2017 5:42 pm
by Spike
"A life that's all about death is no life at all." Hereafter, Directed by Clint Eastwood.