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Climate Change - Ajahn Sujato's Blog

Re: Climate Change - Ajahn Sujato's Blog

Postby partofit22 on Tue Jul 29, 2014 1:52 pm

This past July has been unseasonably chilly- Not every day- But enough for us to dig out warmer clothing- http://www.wunderground.com/cgi-bin/findweather/getForecast?query=chesterland%2C+ohio I Googled, Yahooed and Binged to see if these cooler, unseasonable temps had anything to do with climate change and couldn't find anything- I know this may sound ignorant .. but does global warming only cause "warm weather related events" like drought and heatwaves?
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Re: Climate Change - Ajahn Sujato's Blog

Postby [james] on Wed Jul 30, 2014 1:40 am

partofit22 wrote:This past July has been unseasonably chilly- Not every day- But enough for us to dig out warmer clothing- http://www.wunderground.com/cgi-bin/findweather/getForecast?query=chesterland%2C+ohio I Googled, Yahooed and Binged to see if these cooler, unseasonable temps had anything to do with climate change and couldn't find anything- I know this may sound ignorant .. but does global warming only cause "warm weather related events" like drought and heatwaves?


Yeah, heat rises. I wonder why all that surplus heat doesn't just radiate off into space at an increased rate and, in doing so, become a cold front?
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Re: Climate Change - Ajahn Sujato's Blog

Postby Carol on Thu Sep 04, 2014 1:32 am

Think the Southwest’s Drought Is Bad Now? It Could Last a Generation or More

A new study by Cornell University, the University of Arizona, and the US Geological Survey researchers looked at the deep historical record (tree rings, etc.) and the latest climate change models to estimate the likelihood of major droughts in the Southwest over the next century. The results are as soothing as a thick wool sweater on a midsummer desert hike.

The researchers concluded that odds of a decadelong drought are "at least 80 percent." The chances of a "megadrought," one lasting 35 or more years, stands at somewhere between 20 percent and 50 percent, depending on how severe climate change turns out to be. And the prospects for an "unprecedented 50-year megadrought"—one "worse than anything seen during the last 2000 years"­—checks in at a nontrivial 5 to 10 percent.

Continued here
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Re: Climate Change - Ajahn Sujato's Blog

Postby partofit22 on Thu Sep 04, 2014 1:40 am

Is there anything being done to begin to grow more in other states? Anyone know?
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Re: Climate Change - Ajahn Sujato's Blog

Postby Michaeljc on Thu Sep 04, 2014 2:07 am

partofit22 wrote:This past July has been unseasonably chilly- Not every day- But enough for us to dig out warmer clothing- http://www.wunderground.com/cgi-bin/findweather/getForecast?query=chesterland%2C+ohio I Googled, Yahooed and Binged to see if these cooler, unseasonable temps had anything to do with climate change and couldn't find anything- I know this may sound ignorant .. but does global warming only cause "warm weather related events" like drought and heatwaves?


http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/service/global/map-blended-mntp/201407.gif

Where do you live partof? The image here is temperature anomalies for July. Notice that climate functions as 'cells'. These can change location year by year. During July some locations have temperatures much less than the a 20 year average. Some locations were higher. August here felt particularly chilly to me. I will await the data which usually comes out on around the 20th.

m
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Re: Climate Change - Ajahn Sujato's Blog

Postby partofit22 on Thu Sep 04, 2014 1:15 pm

Michaeljc wrote:
partofit22 wrote:This past July has been unseasonably chilly- Not every day- But enough for us to dig out warmer clothing- http://www.wunderground.com/cgi-bin/findweather/getForecast?query=chesterland%2C+ohio I Googled, Yahooed and Binged to see if these cooler, unseasonable temps had anything to do with climate change and couldn't find anything- I know this may sound ignorant .. but does global warming only cause "warm weather related events" like drought and heatwaves?


http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/service/global/map-blended-mntp/201407.gif

Where do you live partof? The image here is temperature anomalies for July. Notice that climate functions as 'cells'. These can change location year by year. During July some locations have temperatures much less than the a 20 year average. Some locations were higher. August here felt particularly chilly to me. I will await the data which usually comes out on around the 20th.

m



Chesterland, Ohio- It shows blue on the map you provided- It's been a very cool summer- The leaves began to change color in July- Not drastically but pockets here and there, enough though for people to take notice- There was enough rain- And quite a few downpours that caused washouts- Quite often sunny days weren't full sunny days but partial so how they figure out what days to call sunny and what days not sunny is beyond me! If the sun shows its face for a few hours is that day considered sunny? The wet cool weather caused some overall yellowing of plant leaves- I noticed some new mushrooms and these, which were awesome

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monotropa_uniflora

They're actually flowers ..
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Re: Climate Change - Ajahn Sujato's Blog

Postby Carol on Thu Sep 04, 2014 4:42 pm

Global warming is already here and could be irreversible, UN panel says

A 127-page draft report by the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change describes what can be done about it


Associated Press in Washington
theguardian.com, Tuesday 26 August 2014 16.12 EDT

Global warming is here, human-caused and probably already dangerous – and it’s increasingly likely that the heating trend could be irreversible, a draft of a new international science report says.

The United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change on Monday sent governments a final draft of its synthesis report, which combines three earlier, gigantic documents by the Nobel Prize-winning group. There is little in the report that wasn’t in the other more-detailed versions, but the language is more stark and the report attempts to connect the different scientific disciplines studying problems caused by the burning of fossil fuels, such as coal, oil and gas.

The 127-page draft, obtained by The Associated Press, paints a harsh warning of what’s causing global warming and what it will do to humans and the environment. It also describes what can be done about it.

“Continued emission of greenhouse gases will cause further warming and long-lasting changes in all components of the climate system, increasing the likelihood of severe, pervasive and irreversible impacts for people and ecosystems,” the report says. The final report will be issued after governments and scientists go over the draft line by line in an October conference in Copenhagen.

Depending on circumstances and values, “currently observed impacts might already be considered dangerous,” the report says. It mentions extreme weather and rising sea levels, such as heat waves, flooding and droughts. It even raises, as an earlier report did, the idea that climate change will worsen violent conflicts and refugee problems and could hinder efforts to grow more food. And ocean acidification, which comes from the added carbon absorbed by oceans, will harm marine life, it says.

Without changes in greenhouse gas emissions, “climate change risks are likely to be high or very high by the end of the 21st century,” the report says.

In 2009, countries across the globe set a goal of limiting global warming to about another 2 degrees Fahrenheit (-16.67C) above current levels. But the report says that it is looking more likely that the world will shoot past that point. Limiting warming to that much is possible but would require dramatic and immediate cuts in carbon dioxide pollution.

The report says if the world continues to spew greenhouse gases at its accelerating rate, it’s likely that by mid-century temperatures will increase by about another 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit (2 degrees Celsius) compared to temperatures from 1986 to 2005. And by the end of the century, that scenario will bring temperatures that are about 6.7 degrees Fahrenheit warmer (3.7 degrees Celsius).
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Re: Climate Change - Ajahn Sujato's Blog

Postby Carol on Thu Sep 11, 2014 8:16 pm

How to Build a Green Economy Without Sacrificing Jobs
September 11, 2014
by Robert Pollin

Here is the fundamental challenge we confront with climate change. As of 2010, total annual greenhouse gas emissions were at 45 billion metric tons of mostly carbon dioxide (CO2), along with smaller amounts of methane, nitrous oxide and other gases. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) estimates that to stabilize the global average temperature at its current level of around 60.3° Fahrenheit, which is 3.6° above the pre-industrial average of 56.7°, total emissions will need to fall by 40 percent by 2030, to 27 billion metric tons annually, and by 80 percent in 2050, to about 9 billion metric tons.

[...]

In 2010 the United States produced about 17 percent of global emissions, even though we represent only 4 percent of the world’s population. To make our minimally fair contribution toward reducing global emissions, we need to cut our own by at least what the IPCC recommends. Other countries — starting with China, which generates about 20 percent of worldwide emissions — will also need to make comparable cuts. Even though China’s emissions exceed those of the United States, our per-capita emissions are roughly three times higher. The United States therefore bears a special responsibility to deliver dramatic reductions.

Meeting these reduction targets will be challenging, but the goal is not out of reach. This article proposes a transformative US clean energy investment program that can meet the 40 percent reduction target over the next 20 years. I have developed this program in collaboration with Heidi Garrett-Peltier, James Heintz and Bracken Hendricks and with the support of the Center for American Progress (CAP). CAP will publish a book-length version of the study this fall, which includes all the analysis and calculations on which this article is based.

read more here.
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Re: Climate Change - Ajahn Sujato's Blog

Postby TTT on Fri Sep 12, 2014 2:43 am

Hi Carol and others. An intresting topic.
When you are a stranger
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Re: Climate Change - Ajahn Sujato's Blog

Postby partofit22 on Fri Sep 12, 2014 3:12 am

TTT wrote:Hi Carol and others. An intresting topic.


Hi, TTT. :heya:
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Re: Climate Change - Ajahn Sujato's Blog

Postby partofit22 on Thu Oct 09, 2014 1:27 pm

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Re: Climate Change - Ajahn Sujato's Blog

Postby Carol on Wed Oct 15, 2014 6:55 am

Grieving could offer a pathway out of a destructive economic system

More scientific data and superficial behaviour change initiatives won’t help, people need to be engaged at a deep emotional, psychological and spiritual level

Jo Confino
Guardian Professional, Thursday 2 October 2014 13.14 EDT

Is it possible to hold all the grief in the world and not get crushed by it?

I ask this question because our failure to deal with the collective and individual pain generated as a result of our destructive economic system is blocking us from reaching out for the solutions that can help us to find another direction.

Our decision to value above all else comfort, convenience and a superficial view of happiness, has led to feelings of disassociation and numbness and as a result we bury our grief deep within our subconscious.

The consequence is not only a compulsion to consume even more in an attempt to hide our guilt but also a projection of our hidden pain onto the world around us and at the deepest level, the Earth itself.

Just take the recent news from WWF and the Zoological Society of London that we have decimated half of all creatures across land, rivers and the seas over the past 40 years.

We read this and perhaps shake our heads in dismay, and then consume the next news story. The question we should all be asking is why aren’t we on the floor doubled up in pain at our capacity for industrial scale genocide of the world’s species.

The same is true of the human blood and tears that have flowed in continents such as Africa over hundreds of years as a result of our system of economic and cultural exploitation.

It’s time to stop searching for reasons why we are failing to act over the imminent dangers of climate change and other sustainability challenges.

The answer is obvious. We don’t need more scientific data or superficial behaviour change initiatives but to engage individuals at a deep emotional, psychological and spiritual level.

As the mythologist Joseph Campbell pointed out: “It is not society that is to guide and save the creative hero, but precisely the reverse. And so every one of us shares the supreme ordeal – carries the cross of the redeemer – not in the bright moments of his tribe’s great victories, but in the silences of his personal despair.” In particular we need to grieve for the destruction we have wrought so that we have a chance to heal ourselves.

I have just experienced this by taking part in a moving grief ceremony conducted by indigenous people from Africa, North America, Latin America and Australia as part of a conference at Findhorn in Scotland, aimed at creating a narrative of how to transition to a new economy based on social and ecological justice.

The point of recalling the rape, pillage and desecration of communities as well as the destruction of ecosystems and biodiversity is not to get stuck in anger and hopelessness, but to transcend them through the power of compassion and forgiveness.

Patricia McCabe from the Dineh Nation of New Mexico and Arizona, who helped lead the ceremony, says the truth and reconciliation commission in South Africa set up in the wake of apartheid, and the justice and reconciliation process in Rwanda after the genocide, serve as proof that expressing grief can lead to a new beginning.

She says: “Humanity has developed a very deep ability to push devastating information about the impacts of our actions into our subconscious and this is a danger. We are numbing ourselves to this life going out.

“Expressing grief has always been a cathartic experience and a rebalancing mechanism, and I believe it is a part of building the foundation for any new story we might want to tell.”

McCabe believes the techniques used for helping people recover from shocks should be used more widely within communities. While indigenous peoples still suffer terribly from the impacts of past exploitation, McCabe says they can help the world because they still hold a deep and close connection to the land and because they understand the power of ceremony to create transformation.

“Many indigenous peoples have a pact with mother Earth that said we would hold on to the principles of thriving life, and that one day the world would turn back and come to us again,” she says. “To be ready for that, we must also go through our grief in order to truly be able to come back into alignment of our mind, body and spirit.”
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Re: Climate Change - Ajahn Sujato's Blog

Postby Carol on Sun Oct 19, 2014 2:13 am

Can Climate Change Unite the Left?

To avoid catastrophe, we must seize corporate polluters’ wealth. And to do that, we must change everything.
BY Naomi Klein

In December 2012, Brad Werner—a complex systems researcher with pink hair and a serious expression—made his way through the throng of 24,000 earth and space scientists at the fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco. But it was Werner’s session that was attracting much of the buzz. It was titled “Is Earth F**ked?” (Full title: “Is Earth F**ked? Dynamical Futility of Global Environmental Management and Possibilities for Sustainability via Direct Action Activism”).

Standing at the front of the conference room, the University of California, San Diego professor took the crowd through the advanced computer model he was using to answer that rather direct question. He talked about a whole bunch of other stuff largely incomprehensible to those of us uninitiated in complex systems theory. But the bottom line was clear enough: Global capitalism has made the depletion of resources so rapid, convenient and barrier-free that “earth-human systems” are becoming dangerously unstable in response. When a journalist pressed Werner for a clear answer on the “Is earth fucked?” question, he set the jargon aside and replied, “More or less.”

There was one dynamic in the model, however, that offered some hope. Werner described it as “resistance”—movements of “people or groups of people” who “adopt a certain set of dynamics that does not fit within the capitalist culture.” According to the abstract for his presentation, this includes “environmental direct action, resistance taken from outside the dominant culture, as in protests, blockades and sabotage by Indigenous peoples, workers, anarchists and other activist groups.” Such mass uprisings of people—along the lines of the abolition movement and the Civil Rights Movement—represent the likeliest source of “friction” to slow down an economic machine that is careening out of control.

This, he argued, is clear from history, which tells us that past social movements have “had tremendous influence on … how the dominant culture evolved.” It stands to reason, therefore, that “if we’re thinking about the future of the earth, and the future of our coupling to the environment, we have to include resistance as part of that dynamic.” And that, Werner said, is not a matter of opinion, but “really a geophysics problem.” Put another way, only mass social movements can save us now. Because we know where the current system, left unchecked, is headed. We also know, I would add, how that system will deal with the reality of serial climate-related disasters: with profiteering, and escalating barbarism to segregate the losers from the winners. To arrive at that dystopia, all we need to do is keep barreling down the road we are on. The only remaining variable is whether some countervailing power will emerge to block the road, and simultaneously clear some alternate pathways to destinations that are safer. If that happens, well, it changes everything.

[...]

There is no shortage of options for equitably coming up with the cash to prepare for the coming storms while radically lowering our emissions to prevent catastrophic warming. Consider the following:

-- A “low-rate” financial transaction tax—which would hit trades of stocks, derivatives and other financial instruments—could bring in nearly $650 billion at the global level each year, according to a 2011 resolution of the European Parliament (and it would have the added bonus of slowing down financial speculation).
-- Closing tax havens would yield another windfall. The U.K.-based Tax Justice Network estimates that in 2010, the private financial wealth of individuals stowed unreported in tax havens around the globe was somewhere between $21 trillion and $32 trillion. If that money were brought into the light and its earnings taxed at a 30 percent rate, it would yield at least $190 billion in income tax revenue each year.
-- A 1 percent “billionaire’s tax,” floated by the U.N., could raise $46 billion annually.
A $50 tax per metric ton of CO2 emitted in developed countries would raise an estimated $450 billion annually, while a more modest $25 carbon tax would still yield $250 billion per year, according to a 2011 report by the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), among others.
-- Phasing out fossil fuel subsidies globally would conservatively save governments a total $775 billion in a single year, according to a 2012 estimate by Oil Change International and the Natural Resources Defense Council.

These various measures, taken together, would certainly raise enough for a very healthy start to finance a Great Transition (and avoid a Great Depression). Of course, for any of these tax crackdowns to work, key governments would have to coordinate their responses so that corporations had nowhere to hide—a difficult task, though far from impossible, and one frequently bandied about at G20 summits.

To state the obvious: it would be incredibly difficult to persuade governments in almost every country in the world to implement the kinds of redistributive climate mechanisms I have outlined. But we should be clear about the nature of the challenge: It is not that “we” are broke or that we lack options. It is that our political class is utterly unwilling to go where the money is (unless it’s for a campaign contribution), and the corporate class is dead set against paying its fair share.
Battle for the planet

Seen in this light, it’s hardly surprising that our leaders have so far failed to act to avert climate chaos. Indeed, even if aggressive “polluter pays” measures were introduced, it isn’t at all clear that the current political class would know what to do with the money. After all, changing the building blocks of our societies—the energy that powers our economies, how we move around, the designs of our major cities—is not about writing a few checks. It requires bold long-term planning at every level of government, and a willingness to stand up to polluters whose actions put us all in danger. And that won’t happen until the corporate liberation project that has shaped our political culture for three and a half decades is buried for good.

All of this is why any attempt to rise to the climate challenge will be fruitless unless it is understood as part of a much broader battle of worldviews, a process of rebuilding and reinventing the very idea of the collective, the communal, the commons, the civil, and the civic after so many decades of attack and neglect. Because what is overwhelming about the climate challenge is that it requires breaking so many rules at once—rules emerged out of the same, coherent worldview. If that worldview is delegitimized, then all of the rules within it become much weaker and more vulnerable. This is another lesson from social movement history across the political spectrum: When fundamental change does come, it’s generally not in legislative dribs and drabs spread out evenly over decades. Rather it comes in spasms of rapid-fire lawmaking, with one breakthrough after another. The Right calls this “shock therapy”; the Left calls it “populism” because it requires so much popular support and mobilization to occur.

So how do you change a worldview, an unquestioned ideology? Part of it involves choosing the right early policy battles—game-changing ones that don’t merely aim to change laws but change patterns of thought. That means that a fight for a minimal carbon tax might do a lot less good than, for instance, forming a grand coalition to demand a guaranteed minimum income. That’s not only because a minimum income, as discussed, makes it possible for workers to say no to dirty energy jobs but also because the very process of arguing for a universal social safety net opens up a space for a full-throated debate about values— about what we owe to one another based on our shared humanity, and what it is that we collectively value more than economic growth and corporate profits.

Indeed, a great deal of the work of deep social change involves having debates during which new stories can be told to replace the ones that have failed us. Because if we are to have any hope of making the kind of civilizational leap required of this fateful decade, we will need to start believing, once again, that humanity is not hopelessly selfish and greedy—the image ceaselessly sold to us by everything from reality shows to neoclassical economics.

Fundamentally, the task is to articulate not just an alternative set of policy proposals but an alternative worldview to rival the one at the heart of the ecological crisis. A worldview embedded in interdependence rather than hyperindividualism, reciprocity rather than dominance, and cooperation rather than hierarchy. This is required not only to create a political context to dramatically lower emissions, but also to help us cope with the disasters we can no longer afford to avoid. Because in the hot and stormy future we have already made inevitable through our past emissions, an unshakable belief in the equal rights of all people and a capacity for deep compassion will be the only things standing between civilization and barbarism.
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Re: Climate Change - Ajahn Sujato's Blog

Postby Carol on Sun Oct 19, 2014 3:14 am

Practitioners who cultivate the personal realization of buddha knowledge dwell in the bliss of whatever is present and do not abandon their practice.
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Re: Climate Change - Ajahn Sujato's Blog

Postby Carol on Tue Oct 21, 2014 11:07 pm

Dahr Jamail | As Casualties Mount, Scientists Say Global Warming Has Been "Hugely Underestimated"

As we look across the globe this month, the signs of a continued escalation of the impacts of runaway anthropogenic climate disruption (ACD) continue to increase, alongside a drumbeat of fresh scientific studies confirming their connection to the ongoing human geo-engineering project of emitting carbon dioxide at ever-increasing rates into the atmosphere.

A major study recently published in New Scientist found that "scientists may have hugely underestimated the extent of global warming because temperature readings from southern hemisphere seas were inaccurate," and said that ACD is "worse than we thought" because it is happening "faster than we realized."

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Re: Climate Change - Ajahn Sujato's Blog

Postby partofit22 on Mon Jan 26, 2015 9:43 pm

Hope everyone in New Jersey, New York and Connecticut gets theirs .. :)

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Re: Climate Change - Ajahn Sujato's Blog

Postby partofit22 on Mon Apr 13, 2015 6:06 pm

The launch of the Bay Area Dharma Seminar April 2015 series of talks on Climate by Norman Fischer.

http://www.everydayzen.org/teachings/2013/httpedz-audios3amazonawscom01climatetalk1-dharmaseminar-2015-04-01mp3

Norman Fischer gives his second talk in the April 2015 Bay Area Seminar on Climate Change.

http://www.everydayzen.org/teachings/2013/httpedz-audios3amazonawscom02climatechange2-bayareaseminar-2015-04-08mp3

And a video about farming ..

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Re: Climate Change - Ajahn Sujato's Blog

Postby desert_woodworker on Tue Apr 14, 2015 1:13 pm

From data of the Scripps Institute, here is a plotted record of monthly average atmospheric CO2 and Oxygen concentrations measured at the summit of the volcanic mountain, Mauna Loa, on the Big Island of Hawai'i. These data span just the recent years 2000 - 2012.

What's interesting and illustrative to me is the correlation (anti-correlation) between the rise of CO2 concentration and the DROP in O2 concentration. Well, the O2 in CO2 has to come from SOMEWHERE! It's coming from the atmospheric Oxygen we breathe. Some of the CO2, however, comes from cement manufacture, when it is released in the making of quicklime by heating limestone. But most of the extra CO2 comes from oxidation (combustion; burning) of fossil fuels (oil; gas; coal; peat), and from clearing of land (decay and burning of wood and vegetation).

In the 12-year span, Oxygen levels have dropped 300 parts per million. Oxygen is about 21 percent of atmospheric air.

What this graph shows me is that the rise in CO2 comes at the expense of available Oxygen, which means that oxidation is involved (burning of fossil fuels and land-clearing burning).

Other graphs show relative concentrations of Carbon-12 and Carbon-13, over time. Those graphs provide final proof that the rise of CO2 is largely due to the burning of fossil fuels. Carbon in (modern) wood is drawn from the atmospheric and surface sources of carbon constantly irradiated by cosmic rays from space, and this keeps the radioactive isotope C-13 at a higher concentration in (modern) wood than the carbon in fossilized carbon, which is shielded from cosmic rays and from enrichment of C-13 by the overburden of rock, water, and soil covering fossil beds and deposits.

The atmospheric concentration of C-13 in CO2 is DIMINISHING as CO2 rises, which means that more and more carbon from fossilized sources is being released to the air. The source or cause is the burning of fossil fuels, which have a lower C-13 concentration than modern surface-dwelling wood or renewable fuels such as Ethanol from fermentation of corn sugar. C-13 decays, with a half-life of 5730 ± 40 years (which also gives us the wonderfully useful tool of carbon-dating of organic archeological artifacts).

--Joe

CO2_and_O2_graph.png
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Re: Climate Change - Ajahn Sujato's Blog

Postby Carol on Tue Apr 21, 2015 10:55 pm

University offering free online course to demolish climate denial

The University of Queensland’s course examines the science of climate science denial
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Re: Climate Change - Ajahn Sujato's Blog

Postby Michaeljc on Sun Jul 12, 2015 9:35 am

At times I have felt like a lone voice in the wilderness. The momentum supporting the predictions that the world's climate was warming, and that the computer models on which so many political decisions are now be made are robust, has been gaining ground.

Nevertheless, I have always had this distinct feeling based around what I see in nature that we simply did not know enough about all the components that drive climate. I could not see that the proven rise in CO2 was enough to increase the temperature as recorded. There were other concerns: sea temperatures appeared to start rising before the Industrial Revolution. As a geologist I have been exposed to the many cycles within our past. It is a story of chaotic order. The rock record is a window into the future.

I have a friend with whom I spend hours talking through the lack of hard evidence from which to make predictions. He is not trained in science but has a strong grasp of logic and is of superior intelligence. We both agreed that the one great driver of energy on Earth was not attracting enough attention: the sun.

Now: Just of late this has come to light:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/07/150709092955.htm

So: What will come of all this? It will be grasped by the 'denielists' and used politically, just as the opposite was used by those with another political agenda. This is the disgrace.

But, this is dependent - first and foremost- on science: hard, robust, evidence. There is plenty of evidence showing a warming but precious little on what was driving it. The exciting thing from my perspective is that the time frame (15 yrs) is within my life time :dance:

Meantime, folks: don't jump to any conclusions yet. Sit back and enjoy the ride. Nothing we can do will influence what will happen. Keep that open mind :heya:

PS: Just imagine the turmoil and backsliding should temperatures start to cool rapidly. Who will become denialists then? Mind, some tried to ensure a buck each way by dropping the term 'Global Warming' and adopting 'Climate Change' some years ago. This is even harder to defend as climate is always changing anyway.

Anthropogenic influence does effect climate but by how much? Only science and a lot more time can begin to answer this question. Then there is the concern over bad science. Ocean acidity sampling is being undertaken around Hawaii and correlated with atmospheric CO2 levels in the same area. Hawaii is an active volcanic zone for goodness sake. Active submarine fumaroles (vents) will be spewing out acid just as submarine hydrocarbon seeps emit methane.

None of these events have yet been quantified on a global scale . Within the last 3 months NZ researchers have discovered a copious methane seep just off our East Coast. Our continual shelf of the type that holds hydrocarbons is larger than the continent of Australia. How many other methane seeps are there?

There has been over 5000 active submarine volcanoes discovered to date. Most of these will be emitting acid during eruptions. This will never be constant over centuries. There will be waxing and waning. Right now there is talk of a possible increase in tectonic activity (earthquakes) that correlates with increased volcanic activity.

Note: the points made in the above 3 paragraphs are purely mine as far as I know. God forbid that no one else has thought of them. They will, sooner or later.

There are too many unanswered questions
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Michaeljc
 
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