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Buddhist Sacred Art Music, Vol. I

Buddhist Sacred Art Music, Vol. I

Postby mtto on Tue Sep 26, 2017 12:58 am

Pleased to announce the release of the first three tracks from "Buddhist Sacred Art Music, Vol. I." This is a set of eight pieces for a cappella soprano and alto voice, with some clapping by the singers, although these first three compositions are without clapping. The music is a combination of European classical forms such as canon, fugue and passacaglia, mixed with North Indian scales and rhythmic techniques and some American blues and jazz. It is devotional music inspired by my practice of Buddha Dharma, as well as my Sanskrit studies.

"Avalokiteśvara Mantra" is available as a free download. The next two to be recorded are Śākyamuni and Amitābha, which will also be free to download when they're ready for release.

https://johnallengraves.bandcamp.com/track/avalokite-vara-mantra
mtto
 
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Re: Buddhist Sacred Art Music, Vol. I

Postby Spike on Tue Sep 26, 2017 1:17 am

Disconcerting and musically (culturally) incongruent. Criticism offered by one who participated in and appreciated Jiyu Kennett's liturgy. Also a blatant advertisement.
Ripple in still water
When there is no pebble tossed
Nor wind to blow. --R.H.
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Re: Buddhist Sacred Art Music, Vol. I

Postby Linda Anderson on Tue Sep 26, 2017 4:25 am

Spike wrote:Disconcerting and musically (culturally) incongruent. Criticism offered by one who participated in and appreciated Jiyu Kennett's liturgy. Also a blatant advertisement.


Spike,
Can you tell us more about Jiyu Kennett Roshi and your experience with the liturgy. As far as I know, she holds a stake in the lineage. I had a friend who often went to Shasta Abbey after she had died. I'm not a scholar, but I understand that Shasta has a stake in holding the liturgy/Buddhist literature/translations. More so, my impression is she was a master who is surely missed.

linda
Not last night,
not this morning;
Melon flowers bloomed.
~ Bassho
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Re: Buddhist Sacred Art Music, Vol. I

Postby mtto on Tue Sep 26, 2017 5:29 am

All proceeds will be donated to Buddhist Global Relief.
mtto
 
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Re: Buddhist Sacred Art Music, Vol. I

Postby Linda Anderson on Tue Sep 26, 2017 5:51 am

mtto,
just listened ... This music is indeed devotional... can you say more.
linda

mtto wrote:Pleased to announce the release of the first three tracks from "Buddhist Sacred Art Music, Vol. I." This is a set of eight pieces for a cappella soprano and alto voice, with some clapping by the singers, although these first three compositions are without clapping. The music is a combination of European classical forms such as canon, fugue and passacaglia, mixed with North Indian scales and rhythmic techniques and some American blues and jazz. It is devotional music inspired by my practice of Buddha Dharma, as well as my Sanskrit studies.

"Avalokiteśvara Mantra" is available as a free download. The next two to be recorded are Śākyamuni and Amitābha, which will also be free to download when they're ready for release.

https://johnallengraves.bandcamp.com/track/avalokite-vara-mantra
Not last night,
not this morning;
Melon flowers bloomed.
~ Bassho
User avatar
Linda Anderson
 
Posts: 3870
Joined: Mon Feb 09, 2009 7:14 pm
Location: Forestville, CA

Re: Buddhist Sacred Art Music, Vol. I

Postby Spike on Tue Sep 26, 2017 11:41 pm

Linda Anderson wrote:
Spike,
Can you tell us more about Jiyu Kennett Roshi and your experience with the liturgy. As far as I know, she holds a stake in the lineage. I had a friend who often went to Shasta Abbey after she had died. I'm not a scholar, but I understand that Shasta has a stake in holding the liturgy/Buddhist literature/translations. More so, my impression is she was a master who is surely missed.

linda


First visit in 1971. Hitchhiked from Arlington VA to Rochester Zen Center and was a guest student there before hitching across Canada, across the Yukon to Fairbanks Alaska, passage on the southwest Alaska Marine Highway (poop deck lawn chair on the Matanuska for poor hippie walk-ons) to Seattle, and down to Shasta. Thoroughly admired the Kapleau English Heart Sutra, and made it my daily practice to this day. Also fortified Japanese liturgy as learned at Ka Shin Zendo in DC. So: arrive at Shasta. Most building interiors painted pink because previous religious group/owners believed it was the color of heaven . . . Totally unprepared for chanting in Gregorian mode. So different breath-wise, but gorgeous. At that time it really was so unexpected and beautiful (for this former Altar boy), don't know how I would react now, but just appreciated it so much then. Kennett summered at Throssel Hole Buddhist Abbey, so had to come back to see her another time. Wonderful experience. Recommend her book, Selling Water By the River.
Ripple in still water
When there is no pebble tossed
Nor wind to blow. --R.H.
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Spike
 
Posts: 354
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Re: Buddhist Sacred Art Music, Vol. I

Postby mtto on Fri Sep 29, 2017 9:47 pm

Linda Anderson wrote:mtto,
just listened ... This music is indeed devotional... can you say more.
linda


My first experience with devotional practice was in Thich Nhat Hanh's Plum Village Thiền tradition. We did prostrations to Bodhisattvas and the qualities they embody.

On retreats with my Soto Zen group, we chanted the names of Bodhisattvas during the meal chant.

For someone who didn't grow up in a Buddhist family, I felt both attracted and disconnected from these practices. I sensed that it could be potentially transformative, and yet I lacked the embedded context to feel a connection to these beings. As opposed to the Statue of Liberty, which I grew up with and therefore have a deeper symbolic relationship. "My country, 'tis of thee, sweet land of liberty," and "with liberty and justice for all."

As an American, liberty is a big part of our mythology, and Lady Liberty provides a personification of this quality.

The devotional aspect of these pieces is my effort to start bridging this gap in my own practice, and hopefully some others may find some benefit as well.
mtto
 
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Re: Buddhist Sacred Art Music, Vol. I

Postby mtto on Fri Sep 29, 2017 9:59 pm

Additionally, from a musical perspective, I learned Western music partially through church music, as it is such a huge part of the canon.

In my studies of Hindustani classical music, the vocal music is always Hindu devotional texts. Even the instrumental music is often named for gods and goddesses. Many of the great musicians either are Muslims, or are at least from Muslim families, doesn't matter, the texts are still Hindu.

I suppose for many Westerners the sound of Western harmony isn't Christian, it is just what music is supposed to sound like, as fish don't perceive water. The Plum Village Songbook has chants set to Hildegard of Bingen melodies, which are beautiful, but to me anachronistic. The words proclaim the dharma, and the music proclaims Jesus.

For me, combining the Indian and European musical traditions is both a natural outgrowth of studying in both traditions for a long time, and an effort to break down the barriers between the two.

My path to Indian music and my path to Buddhism started from different places, but ended up together.
mtto
 
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Joined: Thu May 08, 2014 8:54 pm


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