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Bodhidharma’s and Dogen’s Comments on the Ten Grave Precepts

Bodhidharma’s and Dogen’s Comments on the Ten Grave Precepts

Postby Gregory Wonderwheel on Mon Jul 06, 2015 12:45 pm

Bodhidharma’s and Dogen’s Comments on the Ten Grave Precepts
~ translated by Gregory Wonderwheel (7/5/2015)

1. Do not kill beings.
B. 一、於自性靈妙常住法中,不生斷滅之見,名不殺生。
1. One’s own nature is wondrously subtle in the midst of the constantly abiding Dharma. To not give birth to views of extinction is called “Do not kill beings.”
D. 第一不殺生戒 - 生命不殺。佛種増長。可續佛慧命。莫殺生命也
First, the precept of ‘Do not kill beings’: life does not kill; the Buddha seeds increase and are able to carry on the destiny of Buddha’s wisdom; there is no killing life.

2. Do not steal.
B. 二、於自性靈妙不可得法中,不生可得之念,名不偷盜。
2. One’s own nature is wondrously subtle in the midst of the unattainable Dharma. To not give birth to thoughts of attaining is called “Do not steal.”
D. 第二不偸盜戒 - 心境如如。解脱門開也
Second, the precept of ‘Do not steal’: mind and circumstances are just thus; the gate of deliverance is open.

3. Do not wantonly desire.
B. 三、於自性靈妙無著法中,不生愛著之見,名不淫欲。
3. One’s own nature is wondrously subtle in the midst of the unattached Dharma. To not give birth to views of attachment to love is called “Do not wantonly desire.”
D. 第三不婬欲戒 - 三輪清淨無所希望。諸佛同道者也
Third, the precept of ‘Do not lewdly desire’: the three wheels are clear and pure with nothing to yearn for; the various Buddhas are the same Way.

4. Do not speak falsely.
B. 四、於自性靈妙不可說法中,不說一字,名不妄語。
4. One’s own nature is wondrously subtle in the midst of the inexplicable Dharma. To not articulate a single word is called “Do not speak falsely.”
D. 第四不妄語戒 - 法輪本轉無剩無缺。甘露一潤得眞得實也
Fourth, the precept of ‘Do not speak falsely’: the wheel of Dharma revolves at the root without surplus, without deficiency; one moistening of its sweet dew attains the real, attains the true.


5. Do not dring alcohol.
B. 五、於自性靈妙本來清淨法中,不生無明,名不飲酒
5. One’s own nature is wondrously subtle in the midst of the pure Dharma coming from the root. To not give birth to unclarity is called “Do not drink alcohol.”
D. 第五不酤酒戒 - 未將來莫教侵。正是大明也
Fifth is the precept ‘Do not trade in alcohol’: there has not yet come and none will come who teach aggression; uprightness is great clarity.

6. Do not articulate faults.
B. 六、於自性靈妙無過患法中,不說過罪,名不說過。
6. One’s own nature is wondrously subtle in the midst of the Dharma without tribulations.
To not articulate transgressions is called “Do not articulate faults.”
D. 第六不説過戒 - 於佛法中同道同法同證同行也。莫教説過。莫令亂道
Sixth, the precept of ‘Do not articulate faults’: in the midst of the Buddha Dharma it is the same Way, the same Dharma, the same realization, the same practice; there are none teaching articulating faults, none decreeing disturbing the Way.

7. Do not praise oneself and disparage another.
B. 七、於自性靈妙平等法中,不說自他,名不自讚毀他。
7. One’s own nature is wondrously subtle in the midst of the Dharma of impartiality.
To not articulate oneself and another is called “Do not praise oneself and disparage another.”
D. 第七不自讃毀他戒 - 乃佛乃祖證盡空證大地。或現大身空無内外。或現法身地無寸土
Seventh, the precept of ‘Do not praise oneself and disparage another’: to be a Buddha, to be an Ancestor, realize the utmost sky, realize the great earth; either manifesting the emptiness of the great body without inside or outside or manifesting the ground of the Dharma body without an inch of land.

8. Do not begrudge the Dharma riches.
B. 八、於自性靈妙真如周遍法中,不生一相慳執,名不慳貪。
8. One’s own nature is wondrously subtle in the midst of the universal Dharma of true suchness. To not give birth to begrudging or grasping at a single appearance is called, “Do not begrudge or covet.”
D. 第八不慳法財戒 - 一句一偈萬象百草也。一法一證諸佛諸祖也。從來未曾慳也
Eighth, the precept of ‘Do not begrudge the Dharma riches’: one phrase, one verse, the myriad shapes the hundred grasses; one Dharma, one realization, the various Buddhas, the various ancestors; at all times there has never been begrudging.

9. Do not be angry.
B. 九、於自性靈妙無我法中,不計實我,名不嗔恚。
9. One’s own nature is wondrously subtle in the midst of the Dharma of no-self. To not reckon a true self is called “Do not be angry.”
D. 第九不瞋恚戒 - 非退非進。非實非虚。有光明雲海。有莊嚴雲海
Ninth the precept of ‘Do not be angry’: neither backsliding nor advancing, neither the true nor the false; there is illumination of clouds and ocean; there is adornment of clouds and ocean.

10. Do not slander the Three Treasures.
B. 十、於自性靈妙一如法中,不起生佛二見,名不謗三寶。
10. One’s own nature is wondrously subtle in the midst of the Dharma of oneness. To not arouse the dualistic view of beings and Buddhas is called “Do not slander the Three Treasures.”
D. 第十不謗三寶戒 - 現身演法。世間津梁。徳歸薩婆若海。不可稱量。頂戴奉勤也
Tenth, the precept of ‘Do not slander the Three Treasures’: the present body expounds the Dharma; the mundane world is the bridge across; virtue returns to the all-knowing ocean; it is incapable of being weighed; on the crown of the head, bear it, receive it respectfully, and be diligent.
Why you do not understand is because the three carts were provisional for former times, and because the One Vehicle is true for the present time. ~ Zen Master 6th Ancestor Huineng
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Re: Bodhidharma’s and Dogen’s Comments on the Ten Grave Prec

Postby desert_woodworker on Mon Jul 06, 2015 3:47 pm

Nice!, Gregory, thanks.

You may know that in the Jukai ceremony in The Diamond Sangha, the Bodhidharma comments are used importantly in the ceremony. And when Jukai is given, it is done in rather solemn circumstances and concentrated atmosphere at the end of 7-day sesshin, following the Sesshin-Ending Ceremony.

As the postulant(s) take(s) up each precept in the ceremony, the assembly recites the corresponding Bodhidharma comment in unison, and then the assembly falls silent, while the postulant recites his or her own prepared comment regarding the particular precept.

Usually, people prepare for months for Jukai, sew a rakusu for themselves (and have it inscribed by Roshi), and prepare a list of "personalizations" of the precepts, while they study the precepts.

In the ceremony, it is very moving to hear the Bodhidharma comment, followed by the comment of the postulant. In Jukai ceremonies in which two or three people are taking Jukai, and not just one person, it is even more rich and moving to hear the several different "takes" on each precept, as each person, our friends, in turn, delivers a personalization from up near the altar, kneeling before Roshi.

The personalizations are brief, pithy, and only about as lengthy as Bodhidharma's comment on each precept. They're concentrated! And it's very interesting indeed to hear what our sangha brothers and sisters emphasize as they take up each precept.

If you don't have a copy at home of the Diamond Sangha "Sutra Book" (Liturgy), Aitken Roshi presents the wording of the Jukai ceremony at the back of the book in the chapter, The Syllabus", in his book, ENCOURAGING WORDS -- ZEN BUDDHIST TEACHINGS FOR WESTERN STUDENTS (1993) (Pp. 189-194). Roshi notes that the comments attributed to Bodhidharma probably come instead from the T'ien-Tai tradition of Chinese Buddhism.

--Joe
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Re: Bodhidharma’s and Dogen’s Comments on the Ten Grave Prec

Postby Nonin on Mon Jul 06, 2015 4:19 pm

Here's another, complete translation of Dogen's Kyujokaimon (Essay and Teaching and Conferring the Precepts), from which Gregory got the above, Dogen's comment on each precept occurs after the precept, which is in bold print:

ESSAY ON TEACHING AND CONFERRING THE PRECEPTS

The great precepts of all Buddhas have been protected and maintained by all Buddhas. There is mutual bestowal from Buddha to Buddha; there is mutual transmission from ancestor to ancestor. Receiving the precepts surpasses the three stages of time; verifying accordance with them is continuous throughout past and present.

Our great teacher, Shakyamuni Buddha, conferred them upon Mahakasyapa; Mahakasyapa conferred them upon Ananda, and so, in this way, the precepts have been legitimately transmitted to me.

Now, I transmit these precepts to you, through which you respectfully repay Buddhas and Ancestors for the depth of their beneficence and everlastingly become a leader for human and heavenly beings. After all, you are able to inherit the wisdom-life of Buddhas and Ancestors.

Respectfully in virtue of the testimonial of Buddhas and Ancestors, you should take refuge in the Triple Treasure and repent. Sincerely repeat these words:

All my past and harmful karma,
Born from beginningless greed, hate, and delusion,
Through body, speech, and mind,
I now fully avow.

As already verified by Buddhas and Ancestors, the karma of body, speech and thought has been cleansed and you have attained great purity. This is due to the power of repentance.

Next, one should take refuge in Buddha, Dharma, and Sangha. There are three kinds of virtue in the Triple Treasure. They are called the Single-bodied Triple Treasure, the Manifested Triple Treasure and the Maintained Triple Treasure.

Unsurpassed, Complete, Perfect Enlightenment is called the Buddha Treasure; its purity and freedom from dust is the Dharma Treasure; the virtue of peace and harmony is the Sangha Treasure. These are called the Single-bodied Triple Treasure.

Realization of Bodhi by manifestation is called the Buddha Treasure; that which is realized by Buddha is the Dharma Treasure; learning the Buddha and Dharma is the Sangha Treasure. These are called the Manifested Triple Treasure.

Edifying heavenly beings, edifying humans, appearing in the vast openness of being or appearing within the dust is the Buddha Treasure. Being changed into the Ocean Storehouse or into sutras
written on shells and leaves, edifying animate and inanimate beings -- this is called the Dharma Treasure. Relieving all suffering and being free from the house of the three worlds is the Sangha Treasure. These are called the Maintained Triple Treasure.

In taking refuge in Buddha, Dharma, and Sangha, one acquires the great precepts of all buddhas. Buddha is your teacher and not one of another way.

THE THREE COLLECTIVE PURE PRECEPTS:

A follower of the Way does no harm.

This is the precept of fulfilling rules and laws. It is the abode of the laws of all Buddhas; it is the source of the laws of all Buddhas.

A follower of the Way does good.

This is the precept of fulfilling Wholesome dharmas. It is the teaching of Unsurpassed, Complete, Perfect Enlightenment and the path of practitioner and what is practiced.

A follower of the Way lives to benefit all beings.

This is the precept of freeing all beings. It is transcending profane and holy and taking self and others across.

These are called the Three Collective Pure Precepts.

THE TEN GRAVE PROHIBITORY PRECEPTS;

I am reverential and mindful with all life; I am not violent; I do not willfully kill.

Life-is-not-killing is facilitating the development of the Buddha Seed and succeeding to the
wisdom life of Buddhas. One must not cut off life.

I respect the property of others; I do not steal.

In the thusness of mind and objects, the gates of liberation open.

I am conscious and loving in my relationships. I do not misuse sexuality.

In virtue of the purity of the three wheels(body, speech, and thought), there is nothing to be desired. It is because the path of all Buddhas is the same and one.

I honor honesty and truth; I do not deceive.

The Dharma wheel turns since the beginning; there is no excess, there is no deficiency. A single
moistening of sweet dew fruits as reality and truth.

I exercise proper care of my body/mind; I am not gluttonous; I do not abuse drugs or encourage others to do so.

Where nothing can be brought in is where anything can be inviolable. This is exactly great
brightness.

I recognize that words can hurt others; I do not slander.

Within the Buddha Dharma, all are the same path, the same teaching, the same realization, the
same practice. One must not discuss the faults of others; one must not disorganize the Way.

I am humble; I do not praise myself or judge others.

Buddhas and Ancestors realize total emptiness and the great earth. Appearing as the great body,
in emptiness there is no inside nor outside; appearing as the dharma body, in earth there is no inch
of ground.

I cultivate letting go; I do not attach to anything, even the teaching.

One phrase, one verse are the myriad forms, the hundred grasses. One dharma and one realization
are all Buddhas and all ancestors. Heretofore, there has been no withholding.

I cultivate inner peace; I do not harbor ill-will.

Neither withdrawn nor set forth, neither real nor unreal are the oceans of illuminated clouds, the
oceans of magnificent clouds.

I esteem the Buddha, Dharma, and Sangha; I do not defame them.

The Dharma unfolded in manifested body is the world's path of crossing over; its virtue returns to
the ocean of all-knowing wisdom; it is unfathomable and should be received with respect and
devotion.

These are the precepts of Buddha in general. We are now instructed to receive them with respect and reverence when they are taught or conferred.
Soto Zen Buddhist Priest. Transmitted Dharma Heir of Dainin Katagiri Roshi.
Abbot and Head Teacher, Nebraska Zen Center / Heartland Temple, Omaha, Nebraska, USA
http://www.prairiewindzen.org
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Re: Bodhidharma’s and Dogen’s Comments on the Ten Grave Prec

Postby Nonin on Mon Jul 06, 2015 4:22 pm

Here' another translation of Bodhidharma's comments on the Precepts, which Gregory also posted above:

BODHIDHARMA'S COMMENTS ON THE ONE-MIND PRECEPTS

To receive is to transmit, and to transmit is to awaken. To realize buddha-mind is to truly receive the precepts.

(1) Self-nature is wondrous and subtle.
Within the everlasting dharma,
Not arousing a view of extinction
Is called the precept of not killing.

(2) Self-nature is wondrous and subtle.
Within the ungraspable dharma,
Not arousing the thought of attainment
Is called the precept of not taking what is not given.

(3) Self-nature is wondrous and subtle.
Within the dharma free from attachment,
Not yielding to the desire to attach to anything
Is called the precept of not misusing sexuality.

(4) Self-nature is wondrous and subtle.
Within the inexplicable dharma,
Not speaking a single word
Is called the precept of not lying.

(5) Self-nature is wondrous and subtle.
Within the intrinsically pure dharma,
Not being blinded by ignorance
Is called the precept of not intoxicating oneself or others.

(6) Self-nature is wondrous and subtle.
Within the flawless dharma,
Not speaking of the faults of others
Is called the precept of not slandering.

(7) Self-nature is wondrous and subtle.
Within the impartial dharma,
Not making a distinction between self and other
Is called the precept of not extolling oneself and putting
down others.

(8) Self-nature is wondrous and subtle.
Within the dharma that is all-pervading true reality,
Not arousing attachment and begrudging the teaching
Is called the precept of not attaching to anything, even the teaching.

(9) Self-nature is wondrous and subtle.
Within the selfless dharma,
Not fixing a self
Is called the precept of not harboring ill-will.

(10) Self-nature is wondrous and subtle.
Within the dharma that is one reality,
Not arousing a dualistic view of sentient beings and buddhas
Is called the precept of not turning away from the Three
Treasures.
Soto Zen Buddhist Priest. Transmitted Dharma Heir of Dainin Katagiri Roshi.
Abbot and Head Teacher, Nebraska Zen Center / Heartland Temple, Omaha, Nebraska, USA
http://www.prairiewindzen.org
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