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Shunryu Suzuki

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Re: Shunryu Suzuki

Postby desert_woodworker on Sat Jun 06, 2015 1:44 am

Howdy,

fukasetsu wrote:No, haven't seen a glass of scotch in months.

Feller savors the Golden Nectar so much, he drinks with his eyes closed. :lol2:

(and he has some company, in that)

Cheers,

--Joe :heya:
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Re: Shunryu Suzuki

Postby partofit22 on Sat Jun 06, 2015 12:44 pm

desert_woodworker wrote:Howdy,

fukasetsu wrote:No, haven't seen a glass of scotch in months.

Feller savors the Golden Nectar so much, he drinks with his eyes closed. :lol2:

(and he has some company, in that)

Cheers,

--Joe :heya:


OMG that's awesome!!! :lol2:
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Re: Shunryu Suzuki

Postby fukasetsu on Sat Jun 06, 2015 2:25 pm

Feller savors the Golden Nectar so much, he drinks with his eyes closed

Brilliant! :lol2:

avadhut gita 1.jpg


A sleepy-eyed grandma
Encounters herself in an old mirror.
Clearly she sees a face,
But it doesn't resemble her at all.
Too bad, with a muddled head,
She tries to recognize her reflection!
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Re: Shunryu Suzuki

Postby littletsu on Sat Jun 06, 2015 5:44 pm

fukasetsu wrote:
Feller savors the Golden Nectar so much, he drinks with his eyes closed

Brilliant! :lol2:

avadhut gita 1.jpg


A sleepy-eyed grandma
Encounters herself in an old mirror.
Clearly she sees a face,
But it doesn't resemble her at all.
Too bad, with a muddled head,
She tries to recognize her reflection!



I bet you have a database of your "pictured quotes" and you just searched nectar and got a few hits, then chose this one.
:PP:
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有燈就有人。
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Re: Shunryu Suzuki

Postby fukasetsu on Sat Jun 06, 2015 5:49 pm

littletsu wrote:I bet you have a database of your "pictured quotes" and you just searched nectar and got a few hits, then chose this one.
:PP:


Haha, no but I do have my favourites, most of them I translated myself in various languages,
the advahut gita for instance was freely translated in Dutch and distributed in a limited edition.

Some 'quotes' I know by Heart. Jai! (or hail as Joe would say)

ps the "muddled" was a special pick for Joe, as a light hearted pun (but still acknowledging his "worries" and efforts) regarding "mixing" ;)

Never try to understand this 'mind of mine' it's worth as much attention and graspable as sand through shaky fingers :)
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Re: Shunryu Suzuki

Postby partofit22 on Sat Jun 06, 2015 8:16 pm

The corner of the garden is my personal favorite .. :) .. in the database ..
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Re: Shunryu Suzuki

Postby desert_woodworker on Sat Jun 06, 2015 9:55 pm

I've heard it said that the best "fertilizer" is "the shadow of the gardener".

--Joe
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Re: Shunryu Suzuki

Postby fukasetsu on Sat Jun 06, 2015 11:12 pm

partofit22 wrote:The corner of the garden is my personal favorite .. :) .. in the database ..


I 'only' have two from suzuki

1.jpg
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Re: Shunryu Suzuki

Postby fukasetsu on Sat Jun 06, 2015 11:16 pm

desert_woodworker wrote:I've heard it said that the best "fertilizer" is "the shadow of the gardener".

--Joe

Reminds me of the dharma lotus sutra (sorry lilletsu) :)

Let it rain!
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Re: Shunryu Suzuki

Postby Monk Rob on Sun Jun 07, 2015 2:06 am

desert_woodworker wrote:hiya, Rob,

Those selected sayings -- or others you treasure -- are also fine candidates for the thread at ZFI called "Your Favorite Dharma Gems", begun by Christopher a while back.

It's quite a "chock-a-block" archive by now, and a great area to peruse. That thread is 'round-about here:

http://zenforuminternational.org/viewto ... harma+gems

best!,

--Joe




Thank you Joe :)
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Re: Shunryu Suzuki

Postby cam101+ on Sat Oct 08, 2016 11:30 am

I've been reading Suzuki's book Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind myself lately. He pretty much nails it. The people who put the book together from his talks did an excellent job of capturing his intent (I would think anyway). There are a few instances of impenetrable Zen double talk, but not many! Highly recommended reading, but not necessarily for the beginner.

One of my favorite philosophers was a sorta wild redneck from Mississippi who once told me "Steve, I don't care if the sun don't come up tomorrow". And he meant it. That's such a liberating Zen statement. "Let go of everything" is what it says to me, including, and most of all, our fears.
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Re: Shunryu Suzuki

Postby desert_woodworker on Sat Oct 08, 2016 4:21 pm

Suzuki's ZMBM has been read mostly by "beginners", I'd say, and they seem to revere it.

It's a skinny book, and so not too off-putting in sheer size, and has nice artwork on cover and back cover (calligraphy on front, and photo on back). Plus, the cute element of the little housefly printed inside, at one place.

About the thickness and heft of a third-grade spelling-book.

The book has been perennially popular since first publication, and that means it's been bought and read mainly by many beginners (or non-practitioners).

What hasn't changed is that in order to understand truly what the Roshi is speaking about, one must practice in the formal way that the Zen Buddhist priest S. Suzuki Roshi is teaching, or was teaching, at the time he delivered his teishos, which someone either attending or not attending later transcribed from tape.

The chief thing that a teacher can do is to encourage students in practice, not to explain anything. The fruit of the tradition is not carried in words.

--Joe

ZMBM_fly_p69.jpg
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Re: Shunryu Suzuki

Postby A Philosopher on Mon Oct 10, 2016 9:29 pm

A very "slow" reading for me. That is, it is so "intense" that I read a few pages and than sit on it till it all sinks in. I like it. Sort of like poetry!

A great scholar and philosopher of religion, Houston Smith, said that it may be one of two most important books in English about Zen Buddhism. The other one being "The Tree Pillars of Zen" by Philip Kapleau.
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Re: Shunryu Suzuki

Postby desert_woodworker on Mon Oct 10, 2016 11:34 pm

A P.,

A Philosopher wrote:...Houston Smith, said that it may be one of two most important books in English about Zen Buddhism. The other one being "The Tree Pillars of Zen" by Philip Kapleau.

I don't disagree. And add to those two Smith's own book, originally entitled THE RELIGIONS OF MAN, and you (one) would have a nice tripod, and point of departure from which possibly to investigate opportunities for true practice.

--Joe
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Re: Shunryu Suzuki

Postby cam101+ on Fri Oct 14, 2016 10:12 am

I was going to give his book to someone that was interested in Buddhism until I realized, as I mentioned, it's not really for beginners. One really needs to have some idea of what he's talking about, and more importantly, some experience of sitting in meditation. There are several places where he had even me a little confused (when he talks about good being the same as bad for instance) until I stopped thinking about it, then it became crystal clear. The book is really about practice, not beliefs or any sort of dead dogmas. In fact, he states emphatically that one should not have any beliefs of any kind, that Buddhism is not about beliefs.

I should say his words are about practice, as he did not write the book. It was compiled (quite admirably and almost magically) from talks that Suzuki gave.

He stresses over and over that zazen IS enlightenment, and I agree. No need to wait for the mythical thunderbolt, the time is now to wake up to our lives. Or as I prefer to think of it, there's no need to be enlightened, one needs to ACT as if one is enlightened. They are one and the same. So many people have gone completely off track wasting years of their lives immersed into arcane Buddhist terminology, and sadly, many Buddhist lineages have reinforced wooden dogmas around lineage, teacher/student relationships, and even the proper colour and threads of a monk's robes!. Well, organize anything and you will usually get what you get.

In many ways, Suzuki's book is in direct opposition to all that is stale, dogmatic and stinks of Zen. It's a truly revolutionary work that demands over and over that we live in the moment, as that is life itself. One of my favorite parts is where he states that unless one understands right effort, if someone is sitting w/ any idea of gain, then they would be better off taking drugs.

I like to think that Suzuki was at heart a Rinzai teacher in a Soto robe. He struck deep into the truths of life w/ a force that was anything but soft. We are fortunate indeed to have his little book that captures the force and clarity of a legendary teacher who mostly taught by non teaching, a form he considered to be the highest form of teaching. With every word he challenges us to let go of expectations, conceptual thought and rote learned behavior or face the consequences of a wasted opportunity in this human form.
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Re: Shunryu Suzuki

Postby Nothing on Fri Oct 14, 2016 8:48 pm

desert_woodworker wrote:A P.,

A Philosopher wrote:...Houston Smith, said that it may be one of two most important books in English about Zen Buddhism. The other one being "The Tree Pillars of Zen" by Philip Kapleau.

I don't disagree. And add to those two Smith's own book, originally entitled THE RELIGIONS OF MAN, and you (one) would have a nice tripod, and point of departure from which possibly to investigate opportunities for true practice.

--Joe

And for those interested in the history, teachings and practice of Buddhism, I would add "Buddhism: A Concise Introduction" also by Houston Smith and his student Philip Novak which is an elaborated and updated version of the section on Buddhism in the "Religions of Man" (later retitled " The World's Religions) and the 2nd half of the book give us the story of Buddhism in the West.

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